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Ksenia Gavrilova

article explores how the relocation plans of young people and judgments about the infrastructure of Tilichiki (Kamchatka, Oliutorskii District) are related to each other. The study reconsiders the concept of unidirectional population flow and analyzes the

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Ritual Infrastructure

Roads to Certainty in Two Brazilian Religions

Inger Sjørslev

Arriving in many big cities in the world, the picture that meets the eye is often one of visible infrastructure. The interior of the city seems to be laid out, particularly in the peripheries where construction work is going on and new roads are

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Fighting Invasive Infrastructures

Indigenous Relations against Pipelines

Anne Spice

Critical infrastructure refers to processes, systems, facilities, technologies, networks, assets and services essential to the health, safety, security or economic well-being of Canadians and the effective functioning of government. … Disruptions of

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Introduction

Infrastructures of Certainty and Doubt

Matthew Carey and Morten Axel Pedersen

uncertainty is briefly evoked, but the complex, patterned and structured forms that underpin or enable certainty and doubt – what we might call their ‘infrastructures’ – are given short thrift. Perhaps the work that comes closest to doing something of this

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Mobility and Infrastructure in the Russian Arctic

Das Sein bestimmt das Bewusstsein?

Nikolai Vakhtin

This special issue of Sibirica arose from a 2015 panel that was part of the annual conference at the European University at St. Petersburg (EUSP). The panel—Mobility and Infrastructure in the Russian Arctic: Das Sein bestimmt das Bewusstsein? 1

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Infrastructures of progress and dispossession

Collective responses to shrinking water access among farmers in Arequipa, Peru

Astrid Oberborbeck Andersen

what constitutes progress in contemporary Peru influence the making of the city and its different possible livelihoods. The story of dispossession and “progress” will be told through two types of infrastructure: material infrastructures that serve to

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Kathleen Frazer Oswald

What Is Smart Transportation Infrastructure? While smart technologies generally align with twenty-first-century sensibilities concerning technology, convenience, safety, and security, no consistent definition for smart exists. 2 In most uses, the

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Xiaoxuan Lu

Infrastructure Imagination: Hong Kong City Futures, 1972–1988 City Gallery, Central, Hong Kong, 24 March 2018 to 16 May 2018 Lead Curators: Cecilia Chu, Dorothy Tang Curatorial Team: Maxime Decaudin, Sben Korsh, Calvin Liang, Christina Lo, Lillian Tam, Olive Wong https://infrastructureimagination.splashthat.com

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Taking the Road for Play

Cyclist Appropriations of Automobile Infrastructures in Vietnam

Ashley Carruthers

After declining in status and mode share sharply with the popularization of the motorcycle, cycling in Vietnam is on the rise. Urban elites who pursue sport and leisure cycling are the most visible of Vietnam’s new cyclists, and they bring their sense of social mastery out onto the road with them by appropriating the nation’s new, automobile-focused infrastructures as places for play and display. While motivated by self-interest, their informal activism around securing bicycle access to new bridges and highways potentially benefits all and contributes to making livable cities. These socially elite cyclists transcend the status associated with their means of mobility as they enact their mastery over automobile infrastructures meant to usher in a new Vietnamese automobility.

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Smita Yadav

Sites of pilgrimage and heritage tourism are often sites of social inequality and volatility that are impaired by hostilities between historical, ethnic, and competing religious discourses of morality, personhood, and culture, as well as between imaginaries of nationalism and citizenship. Often these pilgrim sites are much older in national and global history than the actual sovereign nation-state in which they are located. Pertinent issues to do with finance—such as regimes of taxation, livelihoods, and the wealth of regional and national economies—underscore these sites of worship. The articles in this special issue engage with prolix travel arrangement, accommodation, and other aspects of heritage tourism in order to understand how intangible aspects of such tourism proceed. But they also relate back to when and how these modern infrastructures transformed the pilgrimage and explore what the emerging discourses and practices were that gave newer meanings to neoliberal pilgrimages. The different case studies presented in this issue analyze the impact of these journeys on the pilgrims’ own subjectivities—especially with regard to the holy sites being situated in their imaginations of historical continuity and discontinuity and with regard to their transformative experiences of worship—using both modern and traditional infrastructures.