Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • "inhabited space" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Free access

Emplacing Smells

Spatialities and Materialities of ‘Gypsiness’

Andreea Racleș and Ana Ivasiuc

As one of the most stereotyped minorities, the Roma are particularly ‘good to think’ in relation to constructions of Europeanness. In the production of ‘Gypsiness’, the body, the space, and the materiality of the dwelling are linked through smell as signifiers of a racial and cultural inferiority that does not ‘belong’ in and to Europe. Drawing on research projects carried out in the outskirts of Rome and in a small Romanian town, our contribution relies on a juxtaposed ethnography of constructions of ‘Gypsiness’ in relation to the spatial, sensorial and material inscriptions of the body. The article will examine the relationship between space and the social production of smell, discussing how spaces inhabited by Roma play a role in ‘doing’ Europeanness in a contrastive mode.

Open access

Notes around Hospitality as Inhabitation

Engaging with the Politics of Care and Refugees’ Dwelling Practices in the Italian Urban Context

Camillo Boano and Giovanna Astolfo

need for contemporary architecture and planning to engage critically with the production of inhabitable space, reclaiming the centrality of inhabitation. Questions about what is inhabitable have long defined the nature and governance of urban life

Restricted access

Meshworks and the Making of Climate Places in the European Alps

A Framework for Ethnographic Research on the Perceptions of Climate Change

Sophie Elixhauser, Stefan Böschen, and Katrin Vogel

significantly shaped the landscape surrounding the village. It determines not only the outer limits of the settlement but also the arrangement of inhabited space and agricultural areas; it coproduces sociocultural practices such as leisure activities and fishing

Restricted access

Media Ecologies of Autonomous Automobility

Gendered and Racial Dimensions of Future Concept Cars

Julia M. Hildebrand and Mimi Sheller

sounds of the street. 56 The car affords “the experience of privatized movement to the sound of communication technologies in the automobile.” 57 With the car and its safe and secluding environment, the driver can privatize and personalize the inhabited