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Mary N. Taylor

Since the early 1990s, language used to speak of cultural practices once thought of as "folklore" has become increasingly standardized around the term intangible heritage. Supranational intangible heritage policies promote a contradictory package that aims to preserve local identity and cultural diversity while promoting democratic values and economic development. Such efforts may contribute to the deployment of language that stresses mutual exclusivity and incommensurability, with important consequences for individual and group access to resources. This article examines these tensions with ethnographic attention to a Hungarian folk revival movement, illuminating how local histories of "heritage protection" meet with the global norm of heritage governance in complicated ways. I suggest the paradoxical predicament that both "liberal" notions of diversity and ethno-national boundaries are co-produced through a number of processes in late capitalism, most notably connected to changing relations of property and citizenship regimes.

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Smita Yadav

Sites of pilgrimage and heritage tourism are often sites of social inequality and volatility that are impaired by hostilities between historical, ethnic, and competing religious discourses of morality, personhood, and culture, as well as between imaginaries of nationalism and citizenship. Often these pilgrim sites are much older in national and global history than the actual sovereign nation-state in which they are located. Pertinent issues to do with finance—such as regimes of taxation, livelihoods, and the wealth of regional and national economies—underscore these sites of worship. The articles in this special issue engage with prolix travel arrangement, accommodation, and other aspects of heritage tourism in order to understand how intangible aspects of such tourism proceed. But they also relate back to when and how these modern infrastructures transformed the pilgrimage and explore what the emerging discourses and practices were that gave newer meanings to neoliberal pilgrimages. The different case studies presented in this issue analyze the impact of these journeys on the pilgrims’ own subjectivities—especially with regard to the holy sites being situated in their imaginations of historical continuity and discontinuity and with regard to their transformative experiences of worship—using both modern and traditional infrastructures.

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Adam R. Kaul, Loredana Salis, Mairead Nic Craith and Stefan Handler

Coleman, S. and P. Collins (2007) (eds), Locating the Field, Space, Place and Context in Anthropology (Oxford: Berg), 256 pp., Pb: £19.99, ISBN-13: 978-1845204037.

Screeton, P. (2008), Mars Bars and Mushy Peas: Urban Legend and the Cult of Celebrity (Loughborough: Heart of Albion), 184 pp., Pb: £14.95, ISBN-13: 978-1-905646-11-1.

Smith, L, and A. Natsuko (2009) (eds), Intangible Heritage (London and New York: Routledge) 312 pp., Pb: £23.99, Hb: £70.00, ISBN-13: 978-0-415-47396-5.

Tiesler, N. C. (2006), Muslime in Europa: Religion und Identitätspolitiken unter veränderten gesellschaftlichen Verhältnissen (Münster: LIT), 240 pp., Pb: €24.90, ISBN-13: 978-3-8258-9490-0.

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Cheryl Finley

This article examines the impact of art, performance, and technology on the global transformation of heritage tourism in recent years. Thanks to a series of case studies focusing on sites of memory deemed important to diasporic Africans, this article shows how art, performance, and technology are central to identity formation through an examination of mnemonic aesthetics and practices. Recent changes in heritage tourism have given rise to the establishment of categories such as “tangible“ and “intangible“ heritage as well as the construction of museums, the implementation of walking tours or the promotion of reenactments and ritual performances alongside environmental, volunteer, and virtual tourism. But how do tourists' interpretations of historic sites of memory change when various economic, political, social, and cultural factors converge globally? People seek experiences and outlets that could enable them to cling to those things that are familiar to them, while enabling them to identify with like communities in the midst of ground-shaking social, technological, economic, and political changes. Heritage tourism is one of those social practices that produces a sense of centeredness through a complex negotiation and presentation of memory, art, and performance.

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Francisco Martínez, Eva-Maria Walther, Anita Agostini, José Muñoz-Albaladejo, Máiréad Nic Craith, Agata Rejowska and Tobias Köllner

Andreas Bandak and Manpreet Janeja (eds) (2018), Ethnographies of Waiting: Doubt, Hope and Uncertainty (London: Bloomsbury), 232 pp., €90.46. ISBN 9781474280280.

Liene Ozoliņa (2019), Politics of Waiting: Workfare, Post-Soviet Austerity and the Ethics of Freedom (Manchester: Manchester University Press), 160 pp., £80. ISBN 9781526126252.

Giulia Evolvi (2018), Blogging My Religion: Secular, Muslim, and Catholic Media Spaces in Europe (London and New York: Routledge), 174 pp., £110, ISBN 9781138562110.

Valdimar Tr. Hafstein (2018), Making Intangible Heritage: El Condor Pasa and Other Stories from UNESCO (Bloomington: Indiana University Press), 204 pp., $75.00, ISBN9780253037923.

Valdimar Tr. Hafstein and Áslaug Einarsdóttir, directors and producers (2018), The Flight of the Condor: A Letter, a Song and the Story of Intangible Cultural Heritage, 30 min., available online: http://flightofthecondorfilm.com (accessed 22 July 2019).

Morton Nielsen and Nigel Rapport (eds) (2017), The Composition of Anthropology: How Anthropological Texts Are Written (London: Routledge), 202 pp., Pb £25.99, ISBN 9781138208117.

Agnieszka Pasieka (2015), Hierarchy and Pluralism: Living Religious Difference in Catholic Poland (New York: Palgrave Macmillan), 261 pp., €96.29, ISBN 9781137500526.

Detelina Tocheva (2017), Intimate Divisions: Street-Level Orthodoxy in Post-Soviet Russia (Berlin: LIT Verlag), xv + 185 pp., 29.90€, ISBN 9783643908735.

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Kylie Message, Eleanor Foster, Joanna Cobley, Shih Chang, John Reeve, Grace Gassin, Nadia Gush, Esther McNaughton, Ira Jacknis and Siobhan Campbell

Book Review Essays

Museum Activism. Robert R. Janes and Richard Sandell, eds. New York: Routledge, 2019.

New Conversations about Safeguarding the Future: A Review of Four Books. - A Future in Ruins: UNESCO, World Heritage, and the Dream of Peace. Lynn Meskell. New York: Oxford University Press, 2018. - Keeping Their Marbles: How the Treasures of the Past Ended Up in Museums—And Why They Should Stay There. Tiffany Jenkins. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. - World Heritage and Sustainable Development: New Directions in World Heritage Management. Peter Bille Larsen and William Logan, eds. New York: Routledge, 2018. - Safeguarding Intangible Heritage: Practices and Politics. Natsuko Akagawa and Laurajane Smith, eds. New York: Routledge, 2019.

Book Reviews

The Filipino Primitive: Accumulation and Resistance in the American Museum. Sarita Echavez See. New York: New York University Press, 2017.

The Art of Being a World Culture Museum: Futures and Lifeways of Ethnographic Museums in Contemporary Europe. Barbara Plankensteiner, ed. Berlin: Kerber Verlag, 2018.

China in Australasia: Cultural Diplomacy and Chinese Arts since the Cold War. James Beattie, Richard Bullen, and Maria Galikowski. London: Routledge, 2019.

Women and Museums, 1850–1914: Modernity and the Gendering of Knowledge. Kate Hill. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2016.

Rethinking Research in the Art Museum. Emily Pringle. New York: Routledge, 2019.

A Natural History of Beer. Rob DeSalle and Ian Tattersall. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2019.

Fabricating Power with Balinese Textiles: An Anthropological Evaluation of Balinese Textiles in the Mead-Bateson Collection. Urmila Mohan. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2018.

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Black Lives Matter

The Black Lives Matter Movement in the National Museum of African American History and Culture

Rod Clare

development, open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates and exhibits the tangible and intangible heritage of humanity and its environment for the purposes of education, study and enjoyment.” 4 Most people would tend to define a

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Ambiguous Attachments and Industrious Nostalgias

Heritage Narratives of Russian Old Believers in Romania

Cristina Clopot

-teleuca-viceprimar-in-lipsa-pestelui-lipovenii-s-au-reinventat-19237 > (accessed 20 July 2016 ). Deacon , H. , Dondolo , L. , Mrubata , M. and Prosalendis , S. ( 2003 ), The Subtle Power of Intangible Heritage: Legal and Financial Instruments for Safeguarding Our Intangible Heritage ( Cape Town : HSRC

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Staging Sassoun

Memory and Music Video in Post-Soviet Armenia

Rik Adriaans

moral geography conjuring up exemplary behaviour, [so] that the mere mention of a place-name encapsulates a well-known narrative” ( Connerton 2009: 10 ). This wider project, from mnemonic pop culture to intangible heritage-making, itself seems indicative

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Agonistic Interpretation

A New Paradigm in Response to Current Developments

Nicole Deufel

that aim at the conservation as is of the heritage fabric. In this framing, intangible heritage values are not considered, or not in equal measure. On the other hand, the material definitions of heritage as applied by experts in turn reinforce the