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Nationalism and Internationalism Reconciled

British Concepts for a New World Order during and after the World Wars

Antero Holmila and Pasi Ihalainen

debates in 1917, echoing the ideology of the US Democratic Party and serving the interests of the British Empire as “a league of nations,” as Prime Minister David Lloyd George once put it. 2 Yet, internationalism , a neologism that had emerged in the mid

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Two Failures of Left Internationalism

Political Mimesis at French University Counter-Summits, 2010–2011

Eli Thorkelson

four interconnected claims: (1) Official internationalism—including crucially the Bologna Process—is itself already a project of state mimesis. (2) Activist internationalism emerges to mirror official internationalism through a relationship of

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Caroline Humphrey

In the rethinking of cosmopolitanism that has been under way in anthropology the emphasis in the European tradition of thought, pertaining to humanity in general and universal values, has been replaced by focus on specific and new cosmopolitan peoples and sites. Cosmopolitanism ceases to be only a political idea, or an ideal, and is conceptualized also in terms of practice or process. A vocabulary of 'rooted cosmopolitanism', 'vernacular cosmopolitanism' and 'actually existing cosmopolitanisms' has emerged from the characteristically anthropological acknowledgment of diversity and inevitable attachments to place. This article accepts such an approach, but argues that it has neglected the presence and intense salience of the ideas of cosmopolitanism held by nation states. Such ideologies, especially those promulgated by authoritarian states, penetrate deep into the lives and thoughts of citizens. The article draws attention to the binary and contradictory character of nation state discourse on cosmopolitanism, and to the way this creates structures of affect and desire. The Soviet concept of kosmopolitizm is analyzed. It is contextualized historically in relation to the state discourse on mobility and the practice of socialist internationalism. The article argues that although the Stalinist version of kosmopolitizm became a poisonous and anti-Semitic accusation, indeed an instrument of repression, it could not control the desire created by its own negativity. Indeed, it played a creative and integral part in the emergence of a distinctive everyday cosmopolitanism among Soviet people.

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Talking History

E. P. Thompson, C. L. R. James, and the Afterlives of Internationalism

Utathya Chattopadhyaya

In 1983, H. O. Nazareth directed a film called Talking History, which brought together E. P. Thompson and C. L. R. James in conversation. The soundtrack was composed by Spartacus R, former bassist for the Black Rock band, Osibisa. Over the twenty years since the publication of The Making of the English Working Class in 1963, Thompson had confronted several questions around colonialism, law, and constitutionalism that had not found emphasis in The Making. Talking History marks a unique point in the trajectory of Thompson's engagement with some of those questions, while simultaneously revealing the limits of that engagement. In addition to being a useful window into the political worldview of James and Thompson in the early 1980s, the film is also demonstrative of the afterlives of internationalism in the twentieth century. This article argues that revisiting internationalism, as a practice of political activism and critical dialogue, with its possibilities and limits, allows us to carefully rethink some of our contemporary political and intellectual practices.

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Introduction

Globalizing the History of French Decolonization

Jessica Lynne Pearson

0020743812000852 ; Salar Mohandesi, “Bringing Vietnam Home: The Vietnam War, Internationalism, and May ‘68,” French Historical Studies 41, 2 (2018): 219–251, doi: 10.1215/00161071-4322930 ; and Todd Shepard, “Algeria, France, Mexico, UNESCO: A Transnational

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Conservative Crossings

Bernard Faÿ and the Rise of American Studies in Third-Republic France

John L. Harvey

Perhaps no other French historian led such a sordid academic career as that of Bernard Faÿ, who held the first European chair in American history at the Collège de France from 1932 to his removal in 1944. Celebrated as the leading interwar specialist on America, Faÿ was a steadfast ally of the Catholic political Right. His conservatism, however, never threatened his international stature or his domestic academic standing until 1940, after which he led the Vichy regime's assault on Freemasonry. He succeeded as a historian by employing research on the United States to reject traditions of popular sovereignty, while also embracing new methodological trends that critiqued scientific positivism, often as an attack on the intellectual foundation of the Third Republic. His legacy suggests how the conceptual legitimacy of secular, egalitarian society could be contested through the very ideas that "cosmopolitan modernity" had sought to support.

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Relocalising academic literacy

Diversity, writing and collective learning in an international Master’s programme

Nana Clemensen and Lars Holm

of internationalism represented in the AEG. In class, this concept seemed to be presented as an encounter of separate national entities, including ‘Danishness’ as described by Sara above. But among the interviewed students, internationalism seemed to

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Conflicted Power of the Pen

The Impact of French Internment on the Pacifist Convictions and Literary Imagination of Lion Feuchtwanger

Nicole Dombrowski Risser

radically to the opposite pole of the resistance continuum: advocating arming civilians, including women and teenagers, for acts of sabotage and guerilla warfare against the German army. Sorrowful disillusionment with internationalism as a legitimate vehicle

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The Editors

As we complete our second year of publication, we notice how international our journal has become. We now receive submissions and publish writing from France, Italy, England, Scotland, Israel, Spain, Germany, Denmark, Finland, Hungary, Australia, and the United States. We imagine that this list will continue to grow because of the ubiquitous nature of both film and the disciplines we bring to bear on the subject of the motion picture. This internationalism is made possible by new technologies in communication, and also by the continuing internationalism of the English language. Film has been the most international of art forms since its origins and it seems only fitting that film studies should be a joint collaboration of writers from around the globe.

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Alexander Gofman

In tracking Durkheim's Russian career, this article first explores Russian sociology during his lifetime, emphasizing its internationalism and noting Russian-related reviews in the Année sociologique. It then focuses on the issue of religion, to compare his approach with contemporary Russian trends, especially bogoyiskatielstvo (god quest) and bogostroyitielstvo (god building). In concluding with the Russian reception of his last great work, Les Formes élémentaires, it contrasts the circumstances before and after his death, the year of the Bolshevik Revolution, and especially compares the responses of Nikolai Berdyaev and Pitirim Sorokin.