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Introduction

Comics and Adaptation

Armelle Blin-Rolland, Guillaume Lecomte, and Marc Ripley

Cartmell and Imelda Whelehan have reshaped the field around questions of intertextuality and hypertextuality. 4 They rethought the relationship between source text and adaptation by positing adaptations as ‘second without being secondary’ 5 and by drawing

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Francisca Lladó

writer and illustrator have their point of departure in the past while at the same time maintaining a relation to present-day art forms. Graphical Intertextuality: Riberisation and the Reutilisation of Images As mentioned earlier, the protagonist

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The Art of Braiding

A Clarification

Thierry Groensteen

quotation. When a work or an image, quoted from elsewhere, makes an appearance in a comic (and contemporary comics cultivates all kinds of intertextuality and intericonicity), readers who have the correct reference in their personal encyclopaedia are offered

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Annamari Vänskä

Debates about little girls' loss of innocence, and the sexualization of girls have become an integral part of media in contemporary culture. Fashion advertising representing young girls and certain types of clothes are specifically prone to generate debates about sexualization. This article looks at the sexualization argument through two sets of fashion editorials, one in a December–January 2011 issue of French Vogue, and another in the December–January 1978 issue of the same magazine. The article exposes the problem of sexualization discourse that relates images to lived experiences of girls even though fashion advertising rarely, if ever, is interested in depicting reality. Sexualization is revealed to be a value statement—the Other of innocence which is set up as the norm. Furthermore, fashion photography is shown to be intertextual; images refer to other fashion photographs. In looking at these issues this article opens up space for discussing the visual and sartorial history of the sexual girl.

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The Doll “InbeTween”

Online Doll Videos and the Intertextuality of Tween Girl Culture

Jessica E. Johnston

reading strategies that we will take with us ‘into’ the text” (26). AGTube makes it possible to read American Girl through a range of intertextual experiences and to understand the multiple purposes the doll franchise has in girls’ lives. These online

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Social Criticism through Humour in the Digital Age

Multimodal Extension in the Works of Aleix Saló

Javier Muñoz-Basols and Marina Massaguer Comes

characterised by a high degree of intertextuality and by multimodality, that is ‘the use of several semiotic modes in the design of a semiotic product or event, together with the particular way in which these modes are combined’. 17 This has to do with the way

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Kate Myers

reminiscence and the past, the other opens out to anticipation and the unknowable future. 1 In The Genius to Improve an Invention , Piero Boitani considers literary transition to be transformative, ‘a constant reworking of myths … an intertextual rather

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Pierre Fresnault-Deruelle

within by parasitic animals. A slippage of sense leads us to a sinister self-portrait by Topor, with, in place of the brain, a menacing rodent (and plague carrier). 16 Was Hergé engaging in this same diffuse kind of intertextuality that, from one era to

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Lady into Fox, Fox into Lady

Rewriting Lesbian Stereotypes in Summer Will Show

Gay Wachman

Intertextuality is basic to Sylvia Townsend Warner’s narratives: she is a formidably learned, effortlessly allusive writer. From her slyly absurd references to Wordsworth in the lush tropical setting of Mr. Fortune’s Maggot (1927) through her retelling of Apuleius’s Cupid and Psyche to produce an allegory of class oppression in her first historical novel, The True Heart (1929), to the densely woven intertextuality of Summer Will Show (1936), she uses allusion both to ground her apparently implausible narratives within literary history and to question and parody the politics, ‘history’, and narratology of her predecessors. It is appropriate that in this novel, where the lesbian romance in Paris is precisely coterminous with the 1848 revolution, many of the allusions are to nineteenth-century French literary history. Warner’s ‘unwriting’ of Flaubert’s L’Éducation Sentimentale has received a great deal of attention since it was first noted by Terry Castle in her 1990 theorisation of the lesbian triangular plot. Later writers, in contrast, have emphasised the allusion’s Marxist significance. Quite another fictional genealogy seems more to the point, however, when we consider Warner’s characterisation of Minna Lemuel, the revolutionary Jewish story-teller: the representation, usually by women writers, of the powerful, sexually active, sometimes evil and sometimes doomed femme artiste, as in Madame de Stael’s Corinne, Charlotte Brontë’s Villette, George Sand’s Consuelo, and Colette’s La Seconde. It is now abundantly clear that the intertextuality of Summer Will Show demonstrates that the novel is narratologically, politically, and sexually revolutionary.

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'Picturesque Emotion' or 'Great Asian Mystery'?

Disraeli's Tancred as an Ironic Bildungsroman

Nils Clausson

How we interpret a novel is inseparable from what kind of novel we take it to be, from what genre we assume it belongs to. As Peter Rabinowitz remarks in Before Reading: Narrative Conventions and the Politics of Interpretation, ‘[…] what we attend to in a text is […] influenced by the other works in our minds against which we read it. Particular details stand out as surprising, significant, climactic, or strange in part because they are seen in the context of a particular intertextual grid – a particular set of other works of art.’ The truth of this axiom is strikingly illustrated by the critical history of what is possibly the most persistently misinterpreted novel in English literature, Benjamin Disraeli’s Tancred, or the New Crusade (1847). It has been read almost exclusively against an ‘intertextual grid’ consisting of both Disraeli’s earlier novels, especially Coningsby (1844) and Sybil (1845), and what the contemporary reviewer of the novel in The Times called ‘fiction “with a purpose”’. What the reviewer particularly had in mind was a specific type of novel which Disraeli himself had a hand in creating and which later came to be known, variously, as the condition-of-England novel (a phrase borrowed from Carlyle), the social-problem novel, the industrial novel, or simply as a political novel or a roman à thèse.