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Love is Love

The Recent Jason Jones Judgement in Trinidad and Tobago

Dylan Kerrigan

legal judgement upholding the challenge by Jason Jones to the nineteenth-century colonial laws in T&T that criminalise homosexual relations and same-sex loving. The judge declared that the laws contravened the T&T Constitution and an individual

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Paul Corcoran

The concept of recognition has been employed as a term of art in sovereign diplomacy, and in a philosophical tradition ranging from Plato to Hegel as an archetype of the emergence of political association leading to ethical civil relations. Recent liberal theorists have adapted the Hegelian 'struggle for recognition' to strengthen the argument for humane respect and human rights in the modern, multicultural state. This article emphasizes the cognitive processes and perceptual capacities of recognition. Drawing on Kant and Arendt, this article argues for a broadly aesthetic view of politics as a basis for ethical and moral appraisal, and illustrates this approach with hypothetical and actual examples of politics and art.

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Victor Jeleniewski Seidler

Abstract

What is Jewish about memory and how does it relate to questions of justice and redemption? Within European modernities we learn to think of ourselves as rational selves and within a liberal moral culture to put the past behind us, so making it difficult to engage with the traumatic histories of the Shoah and the moral challenges it offers to European moral traditions. Does Judaism provide a critique of secular moral traditions and open possibilities for an embodied ethical tradition that values memory and so engagements with the past, while reminding us that ‘not to know sufferings means not to be human’? (Genesis Rabbah 92:1).

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Gustavo H. Dalaqua

representatives make inside the assembly. A tenacious endeavour of Urbinati (2014: 22) consists in arguing that, although without ‘authoritative power’ to enact laws, popular judgements circulating outside the representative assembly qualify as a realm of

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Assessment rubrics

Thinking inside the boxes

Cary Bennett

or complex student work’. There are two general rubric assessment approaches: holistic and analytical. Holistic rubrics are used to engender an overall judgement on the quality of performance, whereas an analytical rubric ‘assigns a score to each of

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Jonathan Magonet, Helen Freeman, Albert H. Friedlander, David J. Goldberg, Dow Marmur, Sanford Ragins, Sheila Shulman, and Alexandra Wright

A Survey of New Year Sermons

Facing Fundamentalism

Meditation for Friday, September 15

Israel between Ethics and Politics

‘Truly the Times I Live in Are Dark’

We Must Not Give Up

Some Words for Erev Rosh Hashanah

Reflections

After Judgement: Freedom

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Invoking a World of Ideas

Theory and Interpretation in the Justification of Colonialism

David Boucher

relies upon a distinction between judgements and propositions. Judgements may be warrantably assertible, while it is propositions that are more likely to be subject to verification or refutation ( Burke 1994: 157 ). ‘Judgement’, Dewey argued, ‘may be

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Andrew Dobson

Sartre’s second volume of the Critique of Dialectical Reason1 presents us with an important irony: of all the phenomena of the twentieth century that demand a moral judgement, Stalinism must be near the top of the list – yet such judgement is hard to find in Sartre’s Critique. Part of my task in the following will be to explain this. It is not that moral judgement is wholly absent: Sartre describes the theory and practice of ‘Socialism in One Country’ as a ‘monstrosity’ [CDR2:103] characterised by ‘its uncouth, misguided crudity’ [CDR2:111], and he has no trouble with peremptorily asserting that the Russian Revolution’s good fortune at being pushed through by the ‘Man of Steel’ was matched on the debit side by Stalin’s ‘universal incompetence’ and his ‘dogmatic crudeness’ [CDR2:205].

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'Your Heart Is Not Warm Unless You Steal!'

Constructions of Theft and Stealing

Ada I. Engebrigtsen

A proverb common in Romania, generally referring to gypsies, claims that 'your heart is not warm unless you steel'. During the author's fieldwork in a village in Transylvania it was, obvious, however, that the moral judgement on theft and stealing varies greatly according to context. The article discusses the social construction of theft in different empirical contexts and historical periods from wartime looting in India to theft of state property in Romania and how the definition and judgement in each case are embedded in social relations and social structures. The article's main objective is to unmask social relations of power and domination that are often hidden behind definitions and judgements concerning the acquisition of the property of others. Thus theft cannot be understood as either legal or moral; instead, it ties together the moral and the legal, the collective and the individual, objects and persons in different ways in different contexts.

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Mariam Thalos

Human freedom resides primarily in exercise of that capacity that humans employ more abundantly than any other species on earth: the capacity for judgement. And in particular: that special judgement in relation to Self that we call aspiration. Freedom is not the absence of a field of (other) powers; instead, freedom shows up only against the reticulations of power impinging from without. For freedom worthy of the name must be construed as an exercise of power within an already-present field of power. Thus, liberty and causal necessity are not obverses.