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Akulina Mestnikova

Translator : Jenanne K. Ferguson

responsibility for the preservation of native languages is realized. In other words, it examines the civil initiatives of indigenous peoples of Yakutia in the field of language policy. Issues of the revival, preservation, and development of native languages have

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Joan F. Chevalier

Language contact between Russian and non-Russian-speaking populations in the Russian Federation has typically produced subtractive bilingualism with successive generations of ethnolingual minorities shifting to Russian. Tuvan, an Altai-Sayan Turkic language spoken in the Republic of Tyva in southern Siberia, displayed a high level of intergenerational transmission during the Soviet period. This interdisciplinary study examines the evolution of the Tuvan literary language and the key institutions supporting Tuvan language literacy. The article places the development of Tuvan language literacy in a historical perspective, viewing it as part of the overall evolution of Tuvan-Russian language contact. The article also reviews local policies enacted to revitalize Tuvan literacy since the end of the Soviet period.

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“Is It Bad That We Try to Speak Two Languages?”

Language Ideologies and Choices among Urban Sakha Bilingual Families

Jenanne Ferguson

This article discusses urban ethnic Sakha bilinguals and their language ideologies and choices, especially with regard to the language socialization of their children—both at home and within the educational system. The usage of the Sakha language within urban spaces has been on the rise in the post-Soviet years, but still tends to be acquired in the home environment as a first language, whereas Russian is acquired later in the public sphere and reinforced in the educational system. The article explores some of the ideological and structural barriers toward Sakha acquisition and maintenance that speakers face, with apprehension regarding bilingualism and the mastery of two languages in educational contexts being a key concern for many Sakha parents. The article also discusses language instruction—especially in schools—in light of the need to begin to accommodate those with little or no Sakha knowledge in order to continue to increase the usage of Sakha by urban speakers.

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Speaking of citizenship

Language ideologies in Dutch citizenship regimes

Marnie Bjornson

The Dutch language has become the key technology of the Netherlands' new integration and immigration policy regime. Given the impassioned debates that accompanied language-planning policies in the 1980s, what is most remarkable about the stringent new language policy initiatives is the consensus regarding their necessity. This article analyzes the most ambitious program of the integration regime, inburgering, in the context of the transition to a post-industrial economy and the concomitant restructuring of the labor market. Introduced under the Third Way social democrats in the mid-1990s, the inburgering program was designed to produce the literate laborer of late modernity. This article traces the shift from the 'one nation, one language' ideology associated with welfare state forms of governance to the 'language as commodity' ideology promoted by the Third Way regime. I argue that the inburgering program acted as the Trojan horse of integration politics, introducing the necessity for Dutch language skills into an integration regime that has become the basis for a new politics of exclusion under the current neo-conservative administration.

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Nikolett Szelei

Introduction In line with European trends in education and migration, increasing attention has been given to supporting newcomer students in learning the language of schooling in Portugal. This language policy framework is termed Português

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Two Generations of New Basques

From Euskara as Counterculture to Euskara as the Classroom Language

Hanna Lantto

oppressive language policies of the dictatorship started to change. When I was in the fourth grade, Basque was included as a subject, but it was very ‘light’ – just some vocabulary. I was constantly asking my Basque-speaking classmates – they spoke Basque at

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Sangeeta Bagga-Gupta, Giulia Messina Dahlberg, and Sylvi Vigmo

shift in the field of policy studies pays attention to the performative dimensions of policies. Florence Bonacina-Pugh (2012) , for instance, discusses this in the area of language policy: while ‘“policy” has traditionally been conceptualised as a

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Adapting Brittany

The Ker-Is Legend in Bande Dessinée

Armelle Blin-Rolland

language and culture, in the context of the third French Republic’s ‘neglect’ of Brittany in economic terms, and ‘mistreatment’ of Breton culture in particular through language policy in schools. 7 Indeed, children caught speaking Breton at school had to

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Kendall House, Alexander King, and Karl Mertens

thoughtful manner and suggests a fruitful strategy for further work. I heartily endorse his call for the publication of a reader gathering the most important essays published in the early Soviet years addressing problems of language policy, the

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Niklas Olsen, Irene Herrmann, Håvard Brede Aven, and Mohinder Singh

and the concepts embedded in the texts, archives, discourses—as well as events and movements (Quit India Movement, Maoist Movement, Khilafat, Reform Movements), policies (colonial [and postcolonial] education and language policies), and proper names