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Stefan Groth

Language and its relation to culture has been a topic of research in German Volkskunde [folklore studies] from the beginning of the discipline. While dialectological studies, linguistic specificities of local cultures and language in everyday life have been integral parts of Volkskunde for much of the first part of the twentieth century, the discipline saw a shift away from its philological elements towards a social science orientation in post-Second World War developments. During the last decades, the analysis of linguistic dimensions of everyday culture has been on the margin of scholarly activities in Volkskunde. Starting with a historic perspective on the role of language in the beginnings of the discipline, this article discusses the development and decrease of the study of linguistic aspects. It analyses the role of language in contemporary German Volkskunde both in theory and methodology, and offers perspectives on how the discipline could benefit from a renewed focus on linguistic dimensions of everyday culture.

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Cartographies of Communicability and the Anthropological Archive

Civil War Executions and the Harvard Irish Study

Brigittine French

This article traces ideological constructions of communication that enable powerful actors to determine what counts as silences, lies and surpluses in efficacious narratives about violence (Briggs 2007) in order to elucidate occlusions regarding legacies of the Civil War in the Irish Free State. It does so through a precise triangulation of multiple competing and overlapping narratives from unpublished fieldnotes, interviews, published ethnographies and other first-person accounts. The inquiry highlights social memories of the Irish Civil War that have been 'assumed, distorted, misunderstood, manipulated, underestimated, but most of all, ignored' (Dolan 2003: 2). The article argues that the excesses of the anthropological archive make the recuperation of a multiplicity of collective memories possible through a linguistic anthropological perspective that enumerates the kind of erasures at play in contentious memory-making moments, highlights polyvocality in metapragmatic discourse and tracks the gaps in entextualisation processes of historical narratives about political turmoil.

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BOY

Linguistic Anthropological Notes

Diederik F. Janssen

This article proposes a linguistic anthropological approach to the notion BOY, drawing attention to diverse research methods including etymology, onomasiology, corpus analysis, semantics, discourse analysis, sociolinguistics, and comparative ethnolinguistics. As a popular and flexible lexical device, BOY may function as an operator on the received nature of manhood (by rendering it contingent on the discourse and narrative of development), but also as a possible aid in its ever-imminent bankruptcy by disengaging its stylistics from essentialist understandings of both gender and life phase. BOY, thus, lies at the heart of discussions about masculinity as it relates to performativity, language, and discourse, but, in important ways, it also exceeds and contests the confinements of gender/masculinity research.

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Anthropology of the Word

The Stepsister of Linguistic Anthropology

Grzegorz Godlewski

Anthropology of the word is an approach that originated in Poland, at the University of Warsaw, in the early 1990s. It emerged from philological study of language and literature, by widening and strengthening their cultural dimensions. Gradually, this approach grew closer to linguistic anthropology but retained its specificity, which consists essentially in considering linguistic practices as cultural practices, including language-mediated practices in which the verbal line is only one thread; studying historical forms of linguistic practices; recognising verbal art (including literature) as a set of peculiar linguistic practices and making it a subject of anthropological study; including linguistic practices other than oral and written ones; identifying various cognitive aspects of the textual bias in order to eliminate its distorting effect on the study of linguistic practices.

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Jenanne Ferguson

indigenous language maintenance and revitalization anywhere in the world. Key concepts are clearly and cohesively presented, interwoven into the narrative, and this makes for an accessible book even if linguistic anthropological theory, post-Soviet dynamics

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Reflections on Cosmopolitan

Politesse with Perspectives from Papua New Guinea

Eric Hirsch

), ‘ Introduction: Cultural and Linguistic Anthropology and the Opacity of Other Minds ’, Anthropological Quarterly 81 , no. 2 : 407 – 420 . 10.1353/anq.0.0005 Simmel , G. ( 1971 ), On Individuality and Social Forms ( Chicago : University of Chicago

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Soft skills, hard rocks

Making diamonds ethical in Canada’s Northwest Territories

Lindsay A. Bell

. In A Companion to linguistic anthropology , ed. Alessandro Duranti , 23 – 45 Oxford : Blackwell Publishing . Agha , Asif . 2005 . Vice, footing, enregisterment . Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 15 ( 1 ): 38 – 59 . 10.1525/jlin.2005

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“Close to the skin”

Conceptualizing the intimate functioning of the US–Mexico border

Miranda Dahlin

hierarchies, while simultaneously making its imprint on them. Using the linguistic anthropological concept of “publics” ( Cody 2011 ), Yeh pays close ethnographic attention to multiple mediums of daily communication, to the “micro-mechanics of interaction

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The Limits of Knowing Other Minds

Intellectual Disability and the Challenge of Opacity

Patrick McKearney

.0007 Robbins , Joel . 2020 . “ Mental Opacity .” In The International Encyclopedia of Linguistic Anthropology , ed. James Stanlaw . https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118786093.iela0257 . Robbins , Joel . n.d. “ Opacity of Mind, Imagining Others, and the

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Introduction

Ugly Emotions and the Politics of Accusation

Geoffrey Hughes, Megnaa Mehtta, Chiara Bresciani, and Stuart Strange

can be particularly fruitful. Inspired by the work of Wittgenstein, Das, Cavell, Wilce and Bresciani (forthcoming), we draw on linguistics and linguistic anthropology to critically analyse how language helps to construct concepts – and experiences – of