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Masculinity, Fun, and Social Change

Reflections on The Men and the Boys

C.J. Pascoe

fraternity house, insights that have shaped my work to this day. Three insights in particular stand out. First, Connell makes the point that masculinity happens in groups. Rather than being a result of biology, individual dispositions, or role socialization

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Boys, Inclusive Masculinities and Injury

Some Research Perspectives

Adam White and Stefan Robinson

Sport has traditionally been tasked with the social function of developing masculinity among boys and men in Western society ( Connell 2008 ; Mangan 2000 ). Through its homosocial and hypermasculine structure, sport was useful for the construction

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Masculinity and Autonomous Vehicles

A Degendered or Resegregated Future System of Automobility?

Dag Balkmar and Ulf Mellström

particular and of motor vehicles more generally has historically been related to masculinity through associations with wild, untamable animals (i.e., anthropomorphization), as well as through the car’s associations with power, speed, driving pleasure, and

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In Pursuit of Masculinity

On Aging Bodies, Migration and Youthful Masculinities

Usman Mahar

disengagement and by particular roles that only come with old age ( Lamb 2014 ). What kind of masculinity does ageless engagement promote vis-à-vis a mature disengagement or meaningful decline? People's life-histories and ethnographies of aging can help us to

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Masculinity on Stage

Dueling in the Greek Capital, 1870–1918

Dimitra Vassiliadou

history of masculinity, some researchers have approached the duel by focusing on the male body and its disciplining practices, via its inclusion in the nature/culture divide. The duel was described as a way of exhibiting bravery and integrity, virtues that

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Performing Masculinity

Adolescent African American Boys' Response to Gender Scripting

Lionel C. Howard

This article focuses on the ways in which a select group of adolescent African American males respond to gender scripts. Drawing on interview and focus group data, the article describes four different responses to messages they receive from peers and significant adults about socio-culturally appropriate behaviors and characteristics of masculinity: 1) adapting or modifying their presentations of self, 2) internalizing ascribed gender scripts, 3) resisting, and 4) remaining conflicted about an appropriate response. Narratives highlight the complexity of gender identity development and active participation of African American boys in the construction of a masculine identity that feels most authentic, as well as the role of agents of socialization on identity.

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Mofeyisara Oluwatoyin Omobowale, Offiong Esop Akpabio, and Olukemi Kehinde Amodu

Masculinity as a concept denotes a socioculturally constructed gender identity. Its form varies across cultures and spaces and is defined by social, economic, religious, and geographic contexts per time and space. Masculinity refers to ideals and

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Steven Roberts and Karla Elliott

The field of critical studies on men and masculinities (CSMM) is undergoing a reflexive moment. Tristan Bridges (2019) , for instance, has appealed to CSMM researchers in the Global North to draw on work developed in subfields such as critical

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Robert Morrell

in January 1967. These experiences, among others, propelled me much later to think about and analyze settler masculinity ( Morrell 2001a ). Despite this studied indifference, in fact Australia and South Africa have a lot in common in terms of their

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Heather Ellis

This introductory article explains the aims of the interdisciplinary conference “Masculinity and the Other” held at Balliol College, Oxford, August 29-30, 2007, at which all of the papers comprising this special issue of Thymos: Journal of Boyhood Studies were first presented. It points out the prominence which the notions of the “boy” and boyhood and the life-cycle enjoyed at the conference and seeks more generally to suggest the benefits a more fully integrated discussion of these topics might bring to the fields of masculinity and gender studies.