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Unpacking the Museum Register

Institutional Memories of the Potlatch Collection Repatriation

Emma Knight

and claimant groups, but ultimately result in the return of material heritage and human remains to communities. In the case of the potlatch collection, I argue that in lieu of a predetermined repatriation process, museum staff instead relied on

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Border/land Sustainability

Communities at the External Border of the European Union

Karri Kiiskinen

This article contrasts the Finnish-Russian and Polish-Ukrainian borderlands situated at the external border of the EU. Based on multi-sited fieldwork, it observes how such EU level development concepts as sustainability and multiculturalism address cultural sharing as well as engage communities. Here everyday border crossings are limited, but the policies and practices of cross-border co-operation seek to produce sustainable border crossings in terms of projects and networking. The negotiations of the EU border by local Polish and Finnish actors reflect co-existing and alternative imaginations of borderland heritage. These heritages seem to suggest the 'right' ways not only for border crossings, but also for addressing the continuity and experience of cultural diversity. It is argued that recollections of borderland materiality in these ceded lands become a means for negotiating cultural borders, and verify the difference between European borderlands and borders.

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Mobilizing a “Spiritual Geography”

The Art and Child Artists of the Carrolup Native School and Settlement, Western Australia

Ellen Percy Kraly and Ezzard Flowers

Abstract

As a result of removal and custody of Noongar children from their families and lands—forced mobilities and immobilties over decades, and within days and nights—a distinctive and beautiful artistic heritage emerged. This material heritage, too, was moved through and from Noongar country. Illustrated by the art of Carrolup, the culture and identity of the Noongar people has been transcendent and a “spiritual geography” mapped. As “heart returns home” to Noongar country, there are opportunities for new approaches to the reconciliation of the past for the future. The beauty of the art and the story of Carrolup teach, inspire, and provoke. These mobilities and immobilities hold lessons that continue to travel.

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Elizabeth Plumridge, Conal McCarthy, Kaitlin McCormick, Mark O'Neill, Lee Davidson, Vivian Ting, Alison K. Brown, and Arkotong Longkumer

BENNETT, Tony, Making Culture, Changing Society

GOLDING, Viv, and Wayne MODEST, eds., Museums and Communities: Curators, Collections and Collaboration

KRMPOTICH, Cara, and Laura PEERS, eds., This Is Our Life: Haida Material Heritage and Changing Museum Practice

MESSAGE, Kylie, Museums and Social Activism: Engaged Protest

SCOTT, Carol, ed., Museums and Public Value: Creating Sustainable Futures

SU, Xiaobo, and Peggy TEO, The Politics of Heritage Tourism in China: A View from Lijiang

VAN BROEKHOVEN, Laura, et al., eds., Sharing Knowledge and Cultural Heritage: First Nations of the Americas—Studies in Collaboration with Indigenous Peoples from Greenland, North and South America

WEST, Andy, Museums, Colonialism and Identity: A History of Naga Collections in Britain

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From Global to Local Heritage

Intangible Cultural Heritage and the Role of the Museum

Janet Blake

Heritage has a dual character whereby it can, at the same time, be celebrated for its outstanding universal value while having a special meaning and value for local and, in particular, bearer communities. Basing protection on the former notion of heritage as a universal, global value has been the dominant approach in international law-making since the second half of the twentieth century. More recently, the significance of heritage to local actors has become much better understood and recognised. The tensions associated with this duality have in recent times become evident with the adoption by UNESCO in 2003 of the International Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage. In this treaty, international cultural heritage law-making has shifted from a paradigm that gives value predominantly to the material heritage – monuments, sites, artefacts and other objects – to one that celebrates a living heritage that is primarily located in the skills, knowledge and know-how of contemporary human beings. This article examines the aforementioned shift from an emphasis on global to local heritage and the role museums can play in this with regard to safeguarding intangible aspects of heritage.

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The Magic of Bureaucracy

Repatriation as Ceremony

Laura Peers

has been part of addressing historical inequities of collecting practices and of museological practices that excluded Indigenous perspectives even as they placed Indigenous material heritage items within Eurocentric classifications ( Phillips 1995

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Tlingit Repatriation in Museums

Ceremonies of Sovereignty

Aldona Jonaitis

the American Indian Act (NMAIA) and in 1990 the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), paving the way for Native American tribes to repatriate material heritage and human remains. 4 One of the most successful groups in terms

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Introduction

Engaging Anthropological Legacies toward Cosmo-optimistic Futures?

Sharon Macdonald, Henrietta Lidchi, and Margareta von Oswald

. Krmpotich , Cara , and Laura Peers . 2014 . This Is Our Life: Haida Material Heritage and Changing Museum Practice . Vancouver : University of British Columbia Press . Landkammer , Nora . 2017 . “ Visitors or Community? Collaborative Museology and

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Heritage (Erfgoed) in the Dutch Press

A History of Changing Meanings in an International Context

Hanneke Ronnes and Tamara Van Kessel

heritage, unlike their Protestant peers, Alberdingk Thijm, De Stuers, and Cuypers might well have been influenced by the past destruction of Catholic properties and the efforts needed to maintain Catholic spiritual and material heritage ever since. More

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Materiality as an Agency of Knowledge

Competing Forms of Knowledge in Rachel's Tomb in Tiberias

Nimrod Luz

NGO focused on discovering ancient Jewish material heritage N. L.] and ask them: “How come you say Rachel is buried here? We have cleared the two rooms and no grave.” He tells me we have a reference that is 300 hundred years old to a certain rabbi who