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Transit Migration in Niger

Stemming the Flows of Migrants, but at What Cost?

Sébastien Moretti

policy makers to such movements has been an increasing externalization of their restrictive migration policies to stem the movements of people and to shift the responsibility for preventing irregular immigration to so-called transit states. As the most

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Migration – A New Normal

A Jewish Perspective

Lea Mühlstein

portrayal of wandering, what we today might call migration, is indeed rather sobering. It does not shy away from descriptions of being taken advantage of, enslavement, rape and even attempts of genocide. It reflects the hardships that refugees and migrants

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Migration and Redefining Self

Negotiating Religious Identity among Hazara Women in Germany

Saideh Saidi

advancement of the field. Migration is a transformative parameter in a physical and social setting, and exposure to a new society leads to curiosity, enabling an immigrant to observe, learn new things and reflect upon one's own traditions vis-à-vis the new

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Migration and Migrants between the Favorable and the Problematic

A Discourse Analysis of Secondary School Turkish History Textbooks from 1966 to 2018

Önder Cetin

Introduction Turkey has hosted the largest number of refugees worldwide since 2014. 1 Since then, the mass migration of Syrians has stirred up an increasingly intense debate. Yet this is not the first such migration in modern Turkish history

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Policy coherence for development and migration

Analyzing US and EU policies through the lens of normative transformation

Harlan Koff

The European Union’s 2015–2016 “migration/asylum crisis” gave renewed prominence to discussions over the relationship between migration, security and development in global affairs. The EU’s policy responses to these flows have confirmed that

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Migration, residential investment, and the experience of “transition”

Tracing transnational practices of Albanian migrants in Athens

Gerda Dalipaj

in Greece. The trajectories of the dwellings in which these migrants lived in Albania before their emigration to Greece are examined. Making use of their savings from migration work, the families targeted in this study have invested their incomes in

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Migration Studies in Bulgaria

Scope, Experiences and Developments

Magdalena Elchinova

The article overviews the current state of migration studies in Bulgaria. It is argued that their deficiencies stem from the fact that they are nationally embedded, contingent on ongoing public and political discourses, almost exclusively limited to the sociological, psychological and cultural dimensions of migration, and largely operating with the concepts of community, ethnicity and identity, despite the increasing share of ethnographic descriptions of good quality in the field. The further development of migration studies in Bulgaria will depend on the elaboration of a more complex and systematic analytical framework. A shift from community and ethnicity to gender, kinship, social networks and other explanatory categories is needed. It is also necessary to see the variety of forms of commonality and interaction between migrants in order to see migration as a dynamic phenomenon. Finally, it is crucial to develop an interdisciplinary theoretical framework that would best fit the complex nature of migration.

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Migration in German Textbooks

Is Multiperspectivity an Adequate Response?

Barbara Christophe

This article raises the question of how German textbooks should deal with issues of migration as one of the main challenges in a globalizing age. In order to prepare the ground for a well-founded answer it follows a twofold agenda. In a rst step, previous attempts at analyzing textbook representations of migration are critically scrutinized and read against the background of current debates on methodological approaches to textbook research. In a second step, anthropological research on the structure of public German discourses on migration is cited as a key to developing a truly multiperspectival mode of representing it. Ultimately, the article demonstrates that education alone cannot be given the responsibility of clarifying questions that politics have failed to articulate and that pupils must be taught to participate competently in the discourse on migration policy. They should be familiarized with the various positions advocated in the political sphere, and simultaneously equipped with the necessary tools for critical re ection.

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Development and Migration--Migration and Development

What Comes First? Global Perspective and African Experiences

Stephen Castles

Socio-economic change and human mobility are constantly interactive processes, so to ask whether migration or development comes first is nonsensical. Yet in both popular and political discourse it has become the conventional wisdom to argue that promoting economic development in the Global South has the potential to reduce migration to the North. This carries the clear implication that such migration is a bad thing, and poor people should stay put. This 'sedentary bias' is a continuation of colonial policies designed to mobilise labour for mines and plantations, while preventing permanent settlement in the cities. European policy-makers and academics are particularly concerned with flows from Africa, and measures taken by the European Union and its member states are often designed to reduce these - often in the guise of well-meaning development policies. By contrast, many migration scholars regard human mobility as a normal part of social transformation processes, and a way in which people can exercise agency to improve their livelihoods. This article examines these problems, first by providing a brief history of academic debates on international migration and development. It goes on to look at the politics of migration and development, using both EU policy and African approaches as examples. An alternative approach to migration and development is presented, based on a conceptual framework derived from the analysis of social transformation processes.

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Victor Seow

This thought piece reflects on the workings of modern migration through the prism of metabolism. It contends that the metabolic idiom productively underscores how migration as a process is enabled and evoked by particular flows of materials and energy and how the movement of migrants engenders social and environmental transformations.