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Adapting to Crisis

Migration Research During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Aydan Greatrick, Jumana Al-Waeli, Hannah Sender, Susanna Corona Maioli, Jin L. Li, and Ellen Goodwin

, were told by their universities not to travel and that fieldwork ought to be suspended. PhD students from the UCL Migration Research Unit came together to support one another in this context, leading some of us to develop the two articles presented in

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Christiane Hintermann, Christa Markom, Heidemarie Weinhäupl, and Sanda Üllen

This article examines how the topics of migration, cultural diversity, and discrimination are depicted in current Austrian school textbooks and how they are discussed and perceived by pupils of different age groups attending different types of schools. The discussion concentrates on three main issues: the representation of migration as problematic; the use, critical or otherwise, of specific terms; and whether the history of migration to and from Austria is represented and perceived as part of a common Austrian history. Alongside the findings of the textbook analysis, we show how the involvement of pupils in textbook and migration research can contribute to the production of scientific knowledge in this area.

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Being There While Not Being There

Reflections on Multi-sited Ethnography and Field Access in the Context of Forced Migration

Laura K. McAdam-Otto and Sarah Nimführ

Interpretations, and Forced Migration Research The 1990s were a changing decade for ethnography: both as a specific form of text and as the actual practice of collecting material through fieldwork alike. The Writing Culture Debate ( Abu Lughod 1991 ; Clifford

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Refugee studies in Austria today

From challenges to a research horizon

Leonardo Schiocchet, Sabine Bauer-Amin, Maria Six-Hohenbalken, and Andre Gingrich

challenges. With this perspective in mind, we conclude by proposing a research horizon to counter present strong limitations on forced migration research and steer this research toward a more meaningful direction. The Refugee Outreach and Research Network

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Reflecting on Crisis

Ethics of Dis/Engagement in Migration Research

Ioanna Manoussaki-Adamopoulou, Natalie Sedacca, Rachel Benchekroun, Andrew Knight, and Andrea Cortés Saavedra

, some of whom also identify as migrants, we recognize that we are among the more privileged of the world's displacement-affected communities ( Zaman 2018 ). We are part of the Migration Research Unit PhD Network at University College London, an elite UK

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Politicizing the Transnational

On Implications for Migrants, Refugees, and Scholarship

Riina Isotalo

This article discusses the politicization of the transnational paradigm in terms of development and security, refugee and migrant regimes, and transnational practices. The analysis makes two principal arguments. The first is that diasporas and mobility in general have been both securitized and developmentalized. These two processes are intertwined but also contradictory. While migration is seen as a development resource, 'uncontrolled' population flows—particularly of refugees—are looked upon as security threats by states and policy makers. This duo-faceted approach is at the root of the politicization of the transnational paradigm. The second argument of this text is that this politicization and the neo-liberal mega-trend are also entwined, despite the fact that the scholars who introduced transnationalism to migration research saw it as reflecting a process of globalization 'from below'.

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Maria Nerina Boursinou, Pierre Monforte, and Phevos Simeonidis

Abstract

In this interview with Nerina Boursinou and Pierre Monforte, Phevos Simeonidis—cofounder of the Disinfaux Collective—reflects on the role of civil society organizations in the field of refugee support in Greece, in particular through the focus on their relations with public authorities. The interview provides an account of the changing environment in the field of migration and the diversity of the organizations working to support refugees in Greece, while it highlights such organizations’ ambivalent relations with public authorities. Moreover, the interview discusses the impact of the measures taken by the Greek government(s) to control or repress the activities of civil society organizations in recent years, including their criminalization. Finally, it makes reference to the complex ethics that accompany migration research and support practices, especially in relation to the collective's operation and decision-making processes.

Open access

Introduction

Recentering the South in Studies of Migration

Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

collective that argues that there is a need to challenge the very foundations and nature of knowledge production—to “decolonise migration research” ( Vanyoro 2019 )—and to acknowledge and resist the way that migration research is embedded within and

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Towards Critical Analytical Auto-Ethnography

Global Pandemic and Migrant Women (Im)mobilities in Northern Ireland

Marta Kempny

methodological spaces of migration research between researcher and research participants. What is important here is that individuals usually develop many intersecting identities simultaneously and therefore are unlikely to share all aspects of their identities