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Ro Spankie

One of the original uses of the word ‘interior’ was to describe that which belongs to or exists in the mind or soul, that is, the mental or spiritual, as opposed to that which is bodily. The etymology of the term gives a clue as to how interior space functions in a manner that is different from the architecture that contains it. This article explores the analogy of architecture as body and the interior as mind through the act of drawing out Sigmund Freud’s study and consulting room, with reference to Freud’s diagrams of the mind. Working with diagrams, the article will demonstrate a relation between Freud’s conceptual shift from descriptive anatomy to hypothetical structures of psychoanalysis and the diagrammatic ordering of the spatial arrangement of his practice.

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Encountering the Supernatural

A Phenomenological Account of Mind

Julia Cassaniti and Tanya Marie Luhrmann

In this article we compare the encounter with the supernatural—experiences in which a person senses the immaterial—in Thailand and in the United States. These experiences appear to be shaped by different conceptions of the mind. In the US, there is a sharp, natural division between one's mind and the world; in Thailand, individuals have the moral responsibility to control their minds. These differences appear to explain how people identify and sense the supernatural. In the US, it is an external, responsive agent; in Thailand, it is an energy that escapes from an uncontrolled mind. Here we approach phenomenology—the experience of experience—comparatively, identifying patterns in social expectations that affect the ways in which humans think, feel, and sense. We take an experiential category of life that we know to be universal and use it to analyze cultural concepts that influence the enactment and interpretation of feeling and sensing.

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T.M. Luhrmann

Does the way we think about thought alter the way we recognize the voice of an invisible other? Julian Jaynes thought so. In his famous book, The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind , Jaynes (1976) argued that if people

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Alec Hyslop

If there is no art to find the mind’s construction in the face, how, alas, does Sartre find out that Hell is other people? Because he was looked at? By them? Not necessarily, though no doubt he was. Because he was looked at, that’s how.

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Matthew P. Romaniello

Russian imperialism continues to leave a strong imprint on indigenous cultures across Siberia, and throughout the Russian Federation and the post-Soviet republics. Imperialism is invasive and persistent, and it might be impossible to escape its consequences. In 1986, African novelist and postcolonial theorist Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o published his influential essay collection, Decolonising the Mind: The Politics of Language in African Literature. One of his arguments is that no postcolonial subject could be free from the constraints of imperialism until she or he succeeded in freeing the mind from the trap of an imposed (and foreign) language. Ngũgĩ’s experience was based on his own life growing up in Kenya, but his lesson is as applicable to Siberia as it is for East Africa. For indigenous Siberians, language and education are at the forefront of the ongoing postcolonial struggle to maintain their cultural identities in modern Russia.

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Edward Branigan

Contemporary film theory is noted for its sturm und drang, though in the case of the soundtrack, incompatible attitudes and methods are found mostly below the surface where theoretical presuppositions are ruled by unpredictable melodic contours and accents. This article provides a comprehensive overview of philosophical issues concerning audition. It aims to orient a diverse array of sound theories in relation to a set of core issues involving perceptual processing, language, and mind. The article sounds out various cognitive frameworks, where each type of frame projects a favored description and explanation of sonic phenomena. It argues that what is heard in a sound depends on how one listens, and with what purpose.

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Film, Art, and the Third Culture

A Naturalized Aesthetics of Film—Précis

Murray Smith

naturalism” – the introduction presents a number of themes that are threaded throughout the entire work. These include engagement with evolutionary theory and neuroscience; theories of embodied cognition and the extended mind; worries about theories that

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Creating borders in young minds

A case study of Indian and Pakistani school textbooks

Dhananjay Tripathi

divide between their citizens. One tool utilized to achieve this objective is education, especially through the introduction of textbooks, which are used to create a notion of otherness in young minds and, in many cases, “the other” subsequently takes the

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Fiona Ellis

Being and Nothingness opens with the claim that modern thought has sought to overcome a certain number of dualisms which have embarrassed philosophy in so far as their acceptance provides one with no way of explaining how there can be a relation between mind and world. The dualism of being and appearance is mentioned in this context.1 Sartre contends, however, that modern thought has failed to make good its aim, for the solutions in question have been set out within a framework that presupposes the dualism which was to have been transcended. So, for example, the idealist solution – that being is reducible to appearance – turns out to assume the very conception of appearance implied by the dualistic model (BN 5.iv). By doing so, it fails to provide a genuine alternative to those forms of realism that insist, in similar vein, that there is an insurmountable distinction between being and appearance, and is thus in no better position to explain how there can be a relation between mind and world.

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Borderland of the Mind

The Free City of Danzig and the Sovereignty Question

Elizabeth M. Clark

of the Free City meant competing for the borderland in the minds of Danzigers and thus, for the future shape of Germany. What Was the Free City of Danzig? The Free City of Danzig covered a territory of 1,892 square kilometers, consisting of former