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The End of Arrogance, the Advent of Persuasion

Public Art in a Multicultural Society

Henri Beunders

In Western societies, the boundaries of the freedom of expression had traditionally been expanding, while the boundaries of religion and 'good morals' had been receding. Since the last decade however, this expansion has slowed down, come to a halt, and ultimately reversed. In Europe, anxiety over the expression of protest through violent means has steadily caused governments to abandon the traditional, seemingly limitless adherence to freedom of expression. Political fear over controversy has come to dominate the climate of commissioning public art. In a polarized world, the debate on what is tolerable has taken on an acute urgency. The art world itself no longer has an answer. After a half-century of autonomy, it has succeeded in demolishing its own authority by ridiculing every aspect of external criticism. The only solution now will be a new form of dialogue with all stakeholders involved.

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Sean M. Quinlan Patriotic Taste: Collecting Modern Art in Pre-Revolutionary Paris by Colin B. Bailey

Eugenia Kiesling The Tour de France by Christopher Thompson

Éléonore Lépinard Gender Quotas, Parity Reform, and Political Parties in France by Katherine A. R. Opello

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Editorial

Comics in Dialogue with Other Arts

The Editors

Throughout the history of comics, there has been dialogue between comics and other arts: architecture and literature, caricature and cartoons, painting and music, film and photography, and so on. Some of these, such as architecture, caricature and painting, were present from the very beginnings of comics as a modern art form, in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. For example, the importance of architecture was already apparent in the Northern Looking Glass in a page from 23 January 1826 featuring a cross-section of a building as the framework for a cartoon plate resembling a comics page, though without the sequentiality of the latter.

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Matisse at Vence

An Epilogue to Van Gogh and Gauguin: the Search for Sacred Art

Kenneth E. Silver

Silverman's intent is to emphasize the "critical role of religion in the development of modernism." As an addendum to that pursuit, it should be pointed out that, well into the twentieth century, religion remained crucial to artistic innovation and development (and still is). We now recognize how important apocalyptic imagery was to Wasily Kandinsky's abstraction. In the wake of the Second World War, and French occupation by the Germans, religion made a powerful reappearance in the art of the avant-garde. Henri Matisse's Chapel of the Rosary at Vence is one of the great works of this period; it is worth briefly examining the ways in which Matisse understood the intersection between modern art and his reengagement with Catholicism.

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“Plunging the Soul into Contemplation”

On MoMA's Le Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes

Nicole C. Rudolph

This article reviews the New York Museum of Modern Art's recent Le Corbusier retrospective and its accompanying catalogue. The author critically evaluates the curators' reassessment of Le Corbusier's legacy via the lens of landscape. A key insight gleaned from the show pertains to technologies of mobility: inspired by the views from the automobile, the steamer, and the airplane, Le Corbusier deployed modern materials and techniques of mass construction in order to maximize an inhabitant's contemplation of the natural world. What we learn from Le Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes, the author argues, is that the architect valorized and designed to prioritize “3 Cs”: circulation, composition, and contemplation. The notion of contemplation may be more useful to understanding Le Corbusier's architecture than the concept of landscape.

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Jeanette Atkinson, Tracy Buck, Simon Jean, Alan Wallach, Peter Davis, Ewa Klekot, Philipp Schorch, Wing Yan Vivian Ting, Caroline Turner, Glen St John Barclay, Jennifer Wagelie, and Graeme Were

Steampunk (Bradford Industrial Museum, UK)

Framing India: Paris-Delhi-Bombay . . . (Centre Pompidou, Paris)

E Tū Ake: Māori Standing Strong/Māori: leurs trésors ont une âme (Te Papa, Wellington, and Musée du quai Branly, Paris)

The New American Art Galleries, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond

Scott's Last Expedition (Natural History Museum, London)

Left-Wing Art, Right-Wing Art, Pure Art: New National Art (Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw)

Focus on Strangers: Photo Albums of World War II (Stadtmuseum, Jena)

A Museum That Is Not: A Fanatical Narrative of What a Museum Can Be (Guandong Times Museum, Guandong)

21st Century: Art in the First Decade (QAGOMA, Brisbane)

James Cook and the Exploration of the Pacific (Art and Exhibition Hall of the Federal Republic of Germany, Bonn)

Land, Sea and Sky: Contemporary Art of the Torres Strait Islands (QAGOMA, Brisbane) and Awakening: Stories from the Torres Strait (Queensland Museum, Brisbane)

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Contingency and Constraint

African-American Migration as Seen through Jacob Lawrence's “Migration” Series

Deborah Breen

Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) 11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019 http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2015/onewayticket/ Admission: USD 25/18/14 “I pick up my life, / And take it with me, / And I put it down in Chicago, Detroit, / Buff alo, Scranton, / Any place that is / North and East, / And not Dixie.” Th ese are the opening lines from “One-Way Ticket,” by African-American poet, Langston Hughes (1902–1967). Th e poem provides the emotional and historical core of the “Migration” paintings by Jacob Lawrence (1917–2000), a series that depicts the extraordinary internal migration of African Americans in the twentieth century. Not coincidentally, the poem also provides the title of the current exhibition of the sixty paintings in Lawrence’s series, on display at MoMA, New York, from 3 April to 7 September 2015.1 Shown together for the first time in over twenty years, the paintings are surrounded by works that provide context for the “great migration”: additional paintings by Lawrence, as well as paintings, drawings, photographs, texts, and musical recordings by other African-American artists, writers, and performers of the early to mid-twentieth century.

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“They don’t even know how to copy”

The discourse on originality in Albania’s art world

Sofia Kalo

inability to develop a stable, modern art system of dealers, critics, and collectors. Ultimately, I suggest that the discourse on originality represents a longing for contemporaneity with what is happening beyond Albania’s borders, a longing precipitated by

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Embodiment, Curation, Exhibition

Douglas Gordon’s “Pretty much every film and video work from about 1992 until now”

Jiaying Sim

celebrating the past twenty-five years of contemporary art in Scotland, Douglas Gordon’s exhibition, “Pretty much every film and video work from about 1992 until now,” took centerstage at the Gallery of Modern Art in Glasgow. Gordon contributed to the dialogue

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Jonathan Magonet

, the Jewish Writer and Modern Art’ (Volume 3, No. 1, Summer 1968, 41–50), a study of Saul Bellow's Herzog and Bernard Malamud's The Fixer . He is described in the issue as Lecturer in English in the School of European Studies, the University of