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Methods for Multispecies Anthropology

Thinking with Salmon Otoliths and Scales

Heather Anne Swanson

description of George because it is part of a familiar genre. The ways that salmon are enacted in laboratory practices are precisely the things that scholars engaged in multispecies anthropology and science and technology studies (STS) have become skilled at

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Sensing Multispecies Entanglements

Koto as an ‘Ontology’ of Living

Shiho Satsuka

This article explores how matsutake, with its elusive characteristics that evade human senses, guides humans to cultivate a sensitivity to multispecies entanglements. It analyzes the concept of koto, developed by psychiatrist Bin Kimura, to describe how people learn to notice the events and happenings that a variety of beings are engaging in at every moment, even though these practices often elude human consciousness. Drawing examples from a manga series and two ethnographic cases in Japan—a grassroots satoyama forest revitalization movement and a forest biomass study—the article discusses koto as an ‘ontology’ of entangled life. At the same time, koto raises questions about ‘ontology’, as it indicates the traces of struggle in translating the term itself.

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Decoupling Seascapes

An Anthropology of Marine Stock Enhancement Science in Japan

Shingo Hamada

if the new school of ecological anthropology has reframed “system” as a nonequilibrium and dynamic ecosystem. It is in this anthropological context that multispecies, post-humanist approaches emerged and developed further potential for contributing

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Christian Hunold

my point of embarkation for a multispecies ethnography of hawks and humans in Philadelphia. Encounters between a family of red-tailed hawks and a community of amateur naturalists who observed and cared for them for several years interrogated

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Sarah Besky and Jonathan Padwe

processes. Building on this theoretical work, anthropologists are starting to take seriously, for example, the notion that plants feel ( Myers 2015 ) or that forests think ( Kohn 2013 ). Multispecies and more-than-human inquiries are useful because they

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Eugene N. Anderson, Jodie Asselin, Jessica diCarlo, Ritwick Ghosh, Michelle Hak Hepburn, Allison Koch, and Lindsay Vogt

launching pad, the authors build on Marxist theory, feminist critiques of capitalism, science and technology studies, and multispecies contemplations to question the values (economic and beyond) of labor, what counts as labor, where and when labor takes

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The Alchemy of a Corpus of Underwater Images

Locating Carysfort to Reconcile our Human Relationship with a Coral Reef

Deborah James

( 2016 ), a form of multispecies storytelling of our encounters that enables us to imagine a continuous culture across incomplete information. The images of Carysfort are a mix of coral reef representations including tourist adventure promotion, stock

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Animals, Plants, People, and Things

A Review of Multispecies Ethnography

Laura A. Ogden, Billy Hall, and Kimiko Tanita

This article defines multispecies ethnography and links this scholarship to broader currents within academia, including in the biosciences, philosophy, political ecology, and animal welfare activism. The article is organized around a set of productive tensions identified in the review of the literature. It ends with a discussion of the “ethnographic” in multispecies ethnography, urging ethnographers to bring a “speculative wonder” to their mode of inquiry and writing.

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Pigs, Fish, and Birds

Toward Multispecies Ethnography in Melanesia

Katharina Schneider

This article reviews two strengths of Melanesian anthropology that could make a significant contribution to anthropological research on human-animal relations, specifically to multispecies ethnography. The first strength is an analytical approach to comparative research on gender developed in response to challenges from feminist theory in the 1980s; the second is a wealth of ethnographic detail on human-animal relations, much of it contained in texts not explicitly concerned with them and thus largely inaccessible to nonspecialist readers. The article sets up an analogy between the challenges faced by feminist anthropologists and those currently faced by multispecies ethnographers. It demonstrates how pursuing the analogy allows multispecies ethnographers to draw together analytically, and to reinvestigate a broad range of ethnographic resources containing details on human-animal relations, whose convergence so far remains hidden by divergent theoretical interests.

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Introduction

Elusive Matsutake

Lieba Faier

In this special issue, we draw on our collaborative research as the Matsutake Worlds Research Group to explore the world-making dynamics of multispecies encounters. We center our exploration on matsutake, a gourmet mushroom eaten primarily in Japan. Drawing on cases from around the world, we suggest that the cosmopolitan worlds of matsutake cannot be accounted for by any single agent or individual set of cultural or political economic processes. Rather, we propose that contingent multispecies attunements and coordinations knit together the various world-making processes that allow matsutake to flourish. We use the notion of ‘elusiveness’ to capture these shifting dynamics of attraction, coordination, and elusion.