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Denis Vuka

, where the dynamic aura surrounding each of these glorious historic climaxes was further heightened by the presence of a national leader. This article addresses the visual construction of the myth of the national leader in Albanian textbooks. While some

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George Johnston’s Tibetan Interlude

Myth and Reality in Shangri-La

Paul Genoni and Tanya Dalziell

wonders it might reveal. When early written reports from travelers and missionaries 1 emerged in the eighteenth century they established a myth around Tibetan spirituality that coupled observations of Tibetan Buddhism with the “mystical” appeal of the

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To Smile and Not to Smile

Mythic Gesture at the Russia-China Border

Caroline Humphrey

considering how to analyze the ethnography of sites that expose state-ness, this article will suggest that we should attend to an agentive presence in borderlands, that of ‘myth’. My analytical strategy for this article has been to combine several kinds of

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Myths of Europe

A Theoretical Approach

Chiara Bottici

What are the myths of Europe? This article provides the conceptual framework through which this question may be approached. It begins by defining myth in such a way as to distinguish it from other forms of political symbolism and points to the distinction between cultural and political myths. From here, the relationship between mythical and historical narratives is analyzed via a study of how the main narrative cores through which Europeans have perceived themselves have worked in different periods and contexts as both. It concludes with a more detailed analysis of some of the icons that convey the myths of Europe.

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Stéphane Baciocchi

Marcel Mauss, Henri Hubert and Robert Hertz. Saints, Heroes, Myths, and Rites. Classical Durkheimian Studies of Religion and Society, edited and translated by Alexander Riley, Sarah Daynes and Cyril Isnart, Boulder: Paradigm Publishers, ‘The Yale Cultural Sociology Series’, 2009, 221 pp.

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Parallel Myths, Popular Maps

The Europe of Soccer

Paul Dietschy, David Ranc and Albrecht Sonntag

Although history textbooks are highly revealing sources of what is considered worthy of being included in collective memory, they only tell half the story. The study of the non-official “parallel pantheons” of popular culture also contribute significantly to understanding patterns of perception and self-perception as well as mental representations of “Europe.” For more than a century, soccer, Europe's most widely shared social practice, has contributed to shaping perceptions of what can be encompassed under the term “Europe.” This article focuses on the “popular maps” of Europe that soccer has drawn over the last half-century and hints at the myths of cultural commonality that underpin them. It appears that while soccer represents a somewhat ambiguous metaphor for contemporary Europe, it can also supply interesting insights into the emergence of horizontal bonds between Europeans.

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Materiality as an Agency of Knowledge

Competing Forms of Knowledge in Rachel’s Tomb in Tiberias

Nimrod Luz

Materiality has become a compelling register through which to examine religious manifestations and matters of belief. There is a mounting awareness among scholars of both the tangible aspects of religion and the ways in which material objects are never neutral. Following these theoretical developments, I argue that materiality can serve as a form of agency for a particular version of knowledge to become conventional and accepted as true. This emerging materiality codifies a certain version of the truth. However, such validation through matter is often challenged and categorized as fake or a myth. To illustrate my argument, I explore the newly emerging site of Rachel’s Tomb in Tiberias and the competing versions of truth surrounding it. I contend that its new materiality, which has evolved in recent years, serves as a way of validating the site’s new mythology. However, among locals, who are familiar with the site’s previous materiality, this new knowledge is pejoratively labeled as fake or mythical.

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Brian C. Rathbun

Germany's behavior during the lead-up to the United States' invasion of Iraq in 2003 seemed to confirm that the country is marked by a strategic culture of pacifism and multilateralism. However, a closer look at German actions and pattern of participation in military operations reveals that German pacifism is a myth. There was no cross party consensus on German foreign policy in the 1990s around a principled opposition to the use of force. Even in the early years after the Cold War, the Christian Democrats began very quickly, albeit deliberatively and often secretively, to break down legal and psychological barriers to the deployment of German forces abroad. Pacifism persisted on the left of the political spectrum but gave way following a genuine ideological transformation brought about by the experience of the Yugoslav wars. The nature of Germany's objection to the Iraq invasion, which unlike previous debates did not make ubiquitous references to German history, revealed how much it has changed since the end of the Cold War. Had the election in 2002 gone differently, Germany might even have supported the actions of the U.S. and there would be little talk today of a transatlantic crisis. It is now possible to treat Germany as a "normal" European power.

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Uncanny History

Temporal Topology in the Post-Ottoman World

Charles Stewart

modes of consciousness, probes the loss of the past, readily entertains temporal topology, and produces uncanny histories. Myth and History For the most part, topological histories have been studied under the rubric of ‘myth’ as opposed to history

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"Warn the Duke"

The Sarajevo Assassination in History, Memory, and Myth

Paul Miller-Melamed

How has the Sarajevo assassination been conjured and construed, narrated and represented, in a wide variety of media including fiction, film, newspapers, children’s literature, encyclopedias, textbooks, and academic writing itself? In what ways have these sources shaped our understanding of the so-called “first shots of the First World War”? By treating the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand (28 June 1914) as a "site of memory" à la historian Pierre Nora, this article argues that both popular representations and historical narratives (including academic writing) of the political murder have contributed equally to the creation of what I identify here as the “Sarajevo myth.”