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Gideon M. Kressel, Sasson Bar-Zvi, and Aref Abu-Rabia

Human beliefs in resurrection and life after death, based on lasting exchanges between earth and heaven that prevail in human societies ubiquitously, are presented here and analysed with regard to the customs and rituals of the Negev Bedouin. The article looks at patterns of the mourning process and the different social functions and outcomes of that process. The influence of mystics and the Bedouin's views on death are discussed. Pre-Islamic burial practices and grave visits that reflect both legend and tradition are shown to be on the verge of change as they collide with proper Islam and modernity.

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Portrait

Bruce Kapferer

Bruce Kapferer, Andrew Lattas, Rohan Bastin, and Don Handelman

The idea of writing a personal statement regarding my approach to ritual and to present a self-portrait of my own movement into this field is difficult, to say the least. This is particularly so as the idea has too much of an overriding finality to it—an epitaph, after which there is no more. There is the implication that somehow over the 40 or so years that I have been working in the anthropological field of ritual and religion that I have been building a distinct coherent approach. It is tempting to say so, but it would be wrong. I would say that my orientation has taken many different paths. I have always, like most anthropologists, been directed by the problem-at-hand, given the empirical realities in which I found myself and the issue in the subject of anthropology that appeared to me to be particularly problematic at the time. This has sometimes resulted in a critical look at prevailing orientations and has led me in unexpected directions. The ethnographic materials with which I have been recently working, primarily in North Malabar of the Indian state of Kerala, is setting me off on new routes of analytical possibility, at least new for me. This is also the case with my (see Kapferer 2013a, 2013b, 2014) current interest in film and its relevance for the anthropological study of myth and ritual. Such changes in direction are far from unusual in the ethnographically driven circumstance of anthropology in which ethnography is the ground for analytical and theoretical construction (and not the other way around as in other social sciences where theory governs research, see Kapferer 2007).

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A Purging Presence

The Dog in Zoroastrian Tradition

Mahnaz Moazami

of the fabric of several Zoroastrian rituals and necessary for the performance of these rituals, mainly concerned with death and the afterlife. The conclusion one can draw is that dogs figured prominently in a wide variety of Zoroastrian myths and

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Pierre Déléage

Translator : Translated by Matthew Carey

prophecy. In other words, the content of these ritual discourses has already been stabilized outside the ritual context, although the ritual reiteration of this content serves to further stabilize mythical narratives and ritual sequences. Myths and ritual

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Gauguin and Van Gogh Meet the Ninth Art

Postmodernism and Myths about Great Artists

Matthew Screech

: The Study of Myths and Rituals (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, [1986] 2000), 96. 13 Barthes, Mythologies , 126; Linda Hutcheon, A Poetics of Postmodernism (London: Routledge, 1988), 6. 14 Daniel Madelénat, La Biographie (Paris: Presses