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Takamichi Sakurai

This article excavates Erich Fromm's psychoanalytic conception of narcissism within the framework of his social theory of alienation, thereby revealing the socio-theoretical relevance of the former theory and preparing for theoretical analyses of

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Lissa Weinstein and Banu Seckin

When Craig, an oft-humiliated and unsuccessful street puppeteer, discovers a portal into the body of John Malkovich, he finds that fusion with a live “celebrity puppet” offers a solution to the dilemmas of being human— imperfection, vulnerability, and death. In this fantastical context, the filmmakers raise questions about intention, identity, authorship, and the wisdom of elevating narcissism over Eros. Although a desire to transcend the limitations of the mortal body may be ubiquitous, the unique solution offered in Being John Malkovich is the apparent triumph of this narcissistic fantasy, rather than an acceptance of reality. This article first explores the film's use of the universal imagery of narcissism and then examines how technology, which allows widespread access to a visually oriented media culture, and changes in the meaning of fame have altered the expression of narcissistic fantasies, as well as the anxieties that accompany their fulfillment.

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Debate

In Response to Charlie

Faisal Devji, Jane Garnett, Ghassan Hage, and Sondra L. Hausner

There is a close relation between satire and secularism as the latter came to emerge in Europe. Secularism, as is well-known, gained strength historically as a reaction to an era of European interreligious violence and massacres. It was not only a desire for the separation of church and state, as the classical formula has it. It was also an attempt to keep religious affect out of politics. This was in the belief that religion, because it is faith rather than reasoned thinking, produces too much of a narcissistic affect—that the faithful are unable to ‘keep their distance’ from what they believe in. It was thought that this narcissism was behind the murderous intensity of religiously driven conflicts. Being able to laugh at yourself literally means being able to not take yourself overly seriously. This, in turn, is crucial for the deintensification of the affects generated by the defense of what one believes in and for the relativization of one’s personal beliefs. Such relativization, as Claude Lévi- Strauss argued, is crucial for thinking oneself comparatively and in relation to others (the opposite of narcissism).

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Lale Duruiz

The title of this article comes from the famous Turkish novel Araba Sevdası (The carriage affair) by Recaizade Ekrem, an eminent nineteenth-century Turkish scholar. Jale Parla, professor of literature, describes the novel as a “parody of futile writing and reading activities, as futile as the rounds made by the fancy carriages of Westernized beaus in the fashionable Çamlıca.” She further explains that the car has inspired much fabulation in the Turkish novel, signifying possession, power, narcissism, and a feeling of inferiority inspired by contact with the West. Finally, Parla asserts that the car “might have provided the Turkish psyche with something it desperately needed through all stages of modernization from 1880 to 1990.”

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Julie Van der Wielen

Sartre's analysis of intersubjective relations through his concept of the look seems unable to give an account of intersubjectivity. By distinguishing the look as an ontological conflict from our relation with others in experience, we will see that actually intersubjectivity is not incompatible with this theory. Furthermore, we will see that the ontological conflict with the Other always erupts in experience in the form of an emotion, and thus always involves magic, and we will look into what the presence of the Other adds to such emotion. Emotions I have in front of the Other are directed toward my being-for-others, which escapes me by definition. This has a peculiar consequence when the imaginary is involved, which could help explain complexes such as narcissism and paranoia.

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Marc Matera

Freud to conclude that “the object-choice had been effected on a narcissistic basis, so that when obstacles arise in the way of the object-cathexis it can regress into narcissism.” Moreover, “the relation to the object … is complicated by the conflict of

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Embodiment, Curation, Exhibition

Douglas Gordon’s “Pretty much every film and video work from about 1992 until now”

Jiaying Sim

anymore, but so often tread a thin line between narcissism and complete alienation of both the art works and those at the exhibitions. Thus, curation—as it does in this exhibition—has come to emphasize how one cannot form an embodied connection or relation

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Jay Mechling

forces making narcissism the norm among American adolescents in the late twentieth century ( Twenge 2006 ; Twenge and Campbell 2009 ). In fact, Jean Twenge says the Millennial Generation (born 1982–2000) “has never known a world that put duty before self

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Joost Beuving and Geert de Vries

. Three developments seem to have fostered this trend: fragmentation leading to a narcissism of small differences among scholars and practitioners, NPM's rapid rise in academia, and a strong belief in big data as the way to better understand society

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The Unrealized Potential of Body-Reflexive Practices

Intimations of a New Materialism

Steve Garlick

professional sports cause in Steve's life, especially with regard to how the narcissism it engenders and the dedication to training it requires clash with elements of hegemonic masculinity such as heavy drinking and partying. She notes that Steve's “decisive