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Imagining nation

Women's rights and the transnational movement of Shan women in Thailand and Burma

Pinkaew Laungaramsri

This article explores the relationship between women, nation, nationalism, and transnational women’s practice through the Shan women’s movement in Thailand, particularly the international campaign to stop the systematic rape of Shan women by Burmese soldiers. Employing a feminist critique of nationalism, the article argues that transnational networks allow for the negotiation between national, local, and women’s identities. Whereas the authoritative power of nationalism continues to suppress and silence the transnational subjectivity of women, the Shan women’s movement represents a transnational attempt to contest the confinement of women’s subjectivities within the territorialized nation-state.

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Mobilizing for the petro-nation

Labor and petroleum in Ecuador

Gabriela Valdivia and Marcela Benavides

This article analyzes the struggles of the petroleum labor movement against the neo-liberalization of the petroleum industry in Ecuador. Though originally focused on defending collective bargaining rights, since the 1990s the movement has put forward a populist, nationalist critique of the state's governance of petroleum. The article traces the roots of the movement and focuses on two contested terrains of petroleum politics, refineries and oilfields, to examine labor's role in resource governance. The article argues that by strategically joining concerns over class and nation, over a number of administrations from the 1970s to the 2000s (from populist, military juntas, to neoliberal), the petroleum labor movement became a defining actor in petroleum governance.

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Negotiating the Nation in History

The Swedish State Approval Scheme for Textbooks and Teaching Aids from 1945 to 1983

Henrik Åström Elmersjö

asserted that national narratives survived for an extended time in schools, even after scholars had begun to question their validity. 2 Methodological nationalism—the unreflective containment of scholarly inquiry within the borders of the nation—has been

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Conceptions of Nation and Ethnicity in Swedish Children's Films

The Case of Kidz in da Hood (Förortsungar, 2006)

Anders Wilhelm Åberg

Swedish children's films frequently deal with issues of nation and ethnicity, specifically with “Swedishness”. This may be most obvious in films based on the works of Astrid Lindgren, which abound with nostalgic images of the national culture and landscape. However, films about contemporary Sweden, such as Kidz in da Hood (Förortsungar, 2006) address these issues too. Kidz in da Hood is about children in the ethnically diverse suburbs of Stockholm and it tells the story of a young fugitive, Amina, who is cared for by a young bohemian musician. It is, interestingly, a remake of one of the first Swedish children's films, Guttersnipes (Rännstensungar, 1944). In this article I argue that Kidz in da Hood is a contradictory piece, in the sense that it both celebrates and disavows “Swedishness”, as it substitutes the class conict of Guttersnipes for ethnic conflict.

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Ana-Luana Stoicea-Deram

For almost a century there was a lack of adequate reflection in French sociology on analysis of the nation. The explanation of this delay may lie in the foundations of the discipline itself. But in a major contribution, Marcel Mauss pointed the way to a sociology of the nation. For him, the development of the nation as an object of a new reflection depended on the insights of a multidisciplinary and comparative approach. But sociology had a pivotal role in this approach, helping to grasp the specificity of its object, and holding the key to its analysis, especially through the concept of integration. The slowness to utilize this text shows the difficulty in French sociological thought of working with a link between the social and the political.

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Katja Mihurko Poniž

The article explores to what extent, as well as how and when nationalism, feminism and their intersections facilitated women's entry into the literary field in Slovenia. In particular, this article presents the work of Slovene women writers from about 1850 to 1918 and demonstrates the importance of the journal Slovenka (The Slovene woman, 1897-1902), in which many women writers found their voices and that allowed a relatively brief but fruitful encounter between nationalism and feminism. The main change in the development of Slovene women's literature in the period discussed is the shift from topics connected with the strengthening of national consciousness, which emerged after 1848, to a portrayal of women's subordination and emancipation, which took place at the fin de siècle and the beginning of the twentieth century. The work of women writers introduced independent female characters to Slovene literature. These characters no longer saw their mission solely as sacrificing themselves for the nation.

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Language and a Continent in Flux

Twenty-First Century Tensions of Inclusion and Exclusion

Philip McDermott and Sarah McMonagle

Introduction As the twentieth century was drawing to a close, esteemed British historian Eric Hobsbawm noted, ‘The owl of Minerva which brings wisdom flies out at dusk. It's a good sign it's now circling around nations and nationalism’ ( 1990

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Enis Sulstarova

strictly secular, history textbooks are entrusted with the task of imparting basic knowledge of the main religions in Albania and their relationship with the country’s history. This means that religions are narrated within the Eurocentric, modernist, nation

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Demos and Nation

Misplacing the Dilemmas of the European Union--In Memory of Stanley Hoffmann

Charles S. Maier

federalism that the EU can provide and the virtually existential fulfillment that the nation-state offers. Their reasons, as this essay will explain, vary: Some claim a “democratic deficit” at the European level, although this institutional failing might be

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Making Friends of the Nations

Australian Interwar Magazines and Middlebrow Orientalism in the Pacific

Victoria Kuttainen and Sarah Galletly

the last ocean basin to open for travel while also expanding further into Melanesia and Asia, 1 the Pacific loomed large in the nation’s consciousness and print culture in real and imagined ways. These engagements increased understanding of the region