Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 970 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All content x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Vandana Sukheeja and JapPreet Kaur Bhangu

toward extreme nationalism and regionalism, leading to a heightened sense of difference between the native and the immigrant, while on the other, with the enhanced movement of people across cultures, there is a reinvention of transcultural identities

Restricted access

Digital Natives

Making Sense of the Digital Political Landscape and Assessing the Potential for Mobilization versus Apathy

Patrick Readshaw

as they are presented in Table 1 . The Digital Native versus the Digital Immigrant The term “digital native” refers to an individual who is assumed to have a level of competency with computers and digital systems as a result of being born post

Restricted access

Are “the Natives” Educable?

Dutch Schoolchildren Learn Ethical Colonial Policy (1890–1910)

Elisabeth Wesseling and Jacques Dane

The new policy stipulated that the motherland compensate the East Indies for the riches it had taken from them, introducing measures to (a) raise the material living standards of the local population, (b) educate the “natives,” and (c) facilitate

Restricted access

Neo‐Paganism, Native Faith and indigenous religion

A case study of Malta within the European context

Kathryn Rountree

This article surveys European neo‐Pagan and Native Faith movements that have emerged in the context of pan‐regional developments, new political configurations, environmental concerns and globalisation. While all engage with indigeneity, two broad trends are identified under the Pagan/Native Faith umbrella: (1) the adaptation of Anglo‐American Pagan traditions (e.g. Wicca, Druidry, neo‐shamanism, Goddess spirituality) to local contexts, thereby indigenising them in various ways, (2) the reconstruction of indigenous European religious traditions in connection with contemporary identity politics. Against this backdrop, the paper discusses the indigenising project of Maltese neo‐Pagans, a project characterised by adaptation and inventiveness within the local Catholic context.

Restricted access

Joseph Errington

Indonesian is the national language of the world’s fourth most populous country. Although it has 200 million speakers, it is little known beyond its borders and a narrow circle of area specialists. To reduce its obscurity in the global scheme of things, I will show here how it has developed into an unusually national but ‘un-native’ language. A brief sketch of the language’s history highlights commonsense ideas about language, identity, and nationalism that the Indonesian case does not fit, further reinforcing its uncommon aspects.

Restricted access

Sandhya Ganapathy

This article draws attention to the ways that Alaskan Native sovereignties and economies are increasingly driven by market-rational logics. I examine a proposed land exchange between the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Alaska Native Doyon Corporation that would enable Doyon to pursue oil development ventures on lands exchanged out of the Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge. This plan was made possible due to uneven political and structural relationships created through Native land claims legislation in Alaska, as well as shifts in federal land management policies that have made land more easily exchangeable and developable. These structural inequalities and shifts in state policy have laid the groundwork for neo-liberal development schemes that are pursued in the name of Alaskan Native communities and economies but are also often at their expense.

Restricted access

Native Marriage “Soviet” and “Russian” Style

The Political Economy of Desire and Competing Matrimonial Emotions

Vera Skvirskaja

This article proposes an alternative perspective on the debate on “native families,” and marriage strategies and choices, among rural Nenets on the Yamal Peninsula in Arctic Siberia. 1 It departs from the common narrative put forward by both

Restricted access

Sabrina Melenotte

Since 1994, the Zapatista political autonomy project has been claiming that “another world is possible”. This experience has influenced many intellectuals of contemporary radical social movements who see in the indigenous organization a new political alter-native. I will first explore some of the current theories on Zapatism and the crossing of some of authors into anarchist thought. The second part of the article draws on an ethnography conducted in the municipality of Chenalhó, in the highlands of Chiapas, to emphasize some of the everyday practices inside the self-proclaimed “autonomous municipality” of Polhó. As opposed to irenic theories on Zapatism, this article describes a peculiar process of autonomy and brings out some contradictions between the political discourse and the day-to-day practices of the autonomous power, focusing on three specific points linked to economic and political constraints in a context of political violence: the economic dependency on humanitarian aid and the “bureaucratic habitus”; the new “autonomous” leadership it involved, between “good government” and “good management”; and the internal divisions due to the return of some displaced members and the exit of international aid.

Restricted access

Crystal Fortwangler

This article explores introduced and invasive species, untangling the ways in which disciplinary frameworks across the social sciences, natural sciences, and humanities examine introduced and invasive species and their relations with human societies. It focuses on how attention to this topic varies as well as what the unifying factors and commonalities are, and what benefit we gain from a comparison of approaches. The article discusses work from a range of disciplines to examine and critique the ways in which we think about introduced and invasive species not only in ecological but also in social and cultural terms.

Restricted access

Shakespeare and ‘Native Americans’

Forging Identities through the 1916 Shakespeare Tercentenary

Monika Smialkowska

This article examines the celebrations organised for the 1916 Shakespeare Tercentenary in three American locations: Wellesley, MA; Atlanta, GA; and Grand Forks, ND. By focusing on these hitherto neglected events, the article extends the investigations, initiated by Thomas Cartelli and Coppélia Kahn, into the ways in which the Tercentenary activities in the U.S. participated in the contemporaneous debates concerning American national identity. These investigations have until recently concentrated almost exclusively on the Tercentenary festivities organised in the metropolitan centre of New York City. An examination of the provincial celebrations in regions as diverse as New England, the South, and the Midwest, indicates that the Shakespeare Tercentenary provided a platform for the negotiation of a complex network of interrelated, and sometimes conflicting, national and local identities.