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Shylock and the Nazis

Continuation or Reinvention?

Alessandra Bassey

are important as it is widely assumed that Nazi art stands in artistic isolation, but in-depth comparative performance analysis suggests otherwise. In answering these questions, I hope to show that, especially in the case of Merchant , we should

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John Bendix

Paul Roland, Life in the Third Reich: Daily Life in Nazi Germany, 1933-1945 (London: Arcturus Publishing, 2015)

Eric Kurlander, Hitler’s Monsters: A supernatural history of the Third Reich (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017)

Shelley Baranowski, Armin Nolzen, and Claus-Christian W. Szejnmann, A Companion to Nazi Germany (Hoboken: Wiley, 2018)

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Dan Cohn-Sherbok

Recently two neo-Nazis were tried in Leeds Crown Court for disseminating material which incited Jew-hatred. This case was particularly important since its outcome determined whether Jews are protected under the Public Order Act of 1986.

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John Bendix

Alexander von Plato, Almut Leh and Christopher Thonfeld, eds., Hitler’s

Slaves: Life Stories of Forced Labourers in Nazi-Occupied Europe (New York:

Berghahn Books, 2010)

Frank Biess and Robert Moeller, eds., Histories of the Aftermath: The Legacies

of the Second World War in Europe (New York: Berghahn Books, 2010)

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Gavriel D. Roseneld

Few issues have possessed the centrality or sparked as much controversy

in the postwar history of the Federal Republic of Germany

(FRG) as the struggle to come to terms with the nation’s Nazi past.

This struggle, commonly known by the disputed term Vergangenheitsbewältigung,

has cast a long shadow upon nearly all dimensions of

German political, social, economic, and cultural life and has prevented

the nation from attaining a normalized state of existence in

the postwar period. Recent scholarly analyses of German memory

have helped to broaden our understanding of how “successful” the

Germans have been in mastering their Nazi past and have shed light

on the impact of the Nazi legacy on postwar German politics and

culture. Even so, important gaps remain in our understanding of

how the memory of the Third Reich has shaped the postwar life of

the Federal Republic.

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Gretchen Schafft

Anthropologists who were also medical doctors often had a particularly active role in the Nazi regime, including the SS. One of these, Herbert Grohmann, studied under Eugen Fischer at Kaiser Wilhelm Institut of Anthropologie (KWIA) in Berlin from 1937 to 1938 and became his assistant. Grohmann, an SS officer, was sent to Poland as the head of public health in Lodz while maintaining his association with the KWIA. This article describes the interconnections of anthropology and public health in occupied Poland including the elimination (killing) of mentally ill patients, the implementation of the Deutsche Volksliste and the culling of 'racially fit' children for abduction to Germany. All of these activities are seen through the career of Herbert Grohmann.

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Jonathan A. Bush

Nathan Stoltzfus and Henry Friedlander, eds., Nazi Crimes and the Law (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008).

Nazi Crimes and the Law, a collection of eleven studies introduced and edited by Nathan Stoltzfus and Henry Friedlander, is the best collection to appear in years on war crimes trials of Germans. The following paragraphs will attempt to describe what the various essays offer and why they matter.

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Eric Brothers

The rise of neo-Nazism in the capital of the former German Democratic Republic (GDR) was not inspired by a desire to recreate Hitler's Reich, but by youthful rebellion against the political and social culture of the GDR's Communist regime. This is detailed in Fuehrer-Ex: Memoirs of a Former Neo-Naxi by Ingo Hasselbach with Tom Reiss (Random House, New York, 1996). This movement, however, eventually worked towards returning Germany to its former 'glory' under the Third Reich under the guidance of 'professional' Nazis.

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Inge Manka

During the course of the 2006 Soccer World Cup, Germans started to celebrate a “new patriotism.” As the construction of national identity is inseparable in Germany from the Nazi past, this occurrence can be considered an indicator of an altered relationship to this past. This article examines these changes by focusing on a nationally recognized site of remembrance, the former Nazi Party Rally Grounds in Nuremberg, where five matches of the World Cup were played. The convergence of site and event evokes contradictions and ambiguities, such as the encounter of the opposed needs of sports and remembrance at the same location. It shows what problems arise at a site of national collective memory today, when the role of the national collective is challenged by developments like European integration, migration within and to Europe, and the on-going effects of globalization.

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Steven M. Whiting

After Different Drummers (1992) and The Twisted Muse (1997), Michael

H. Kater has presented Composers of the Nazi Era: Eight Portraits, as

“the last in a trilogy on the interrelationship between sociopolitical

forces on the one side, and music and musicians in the Third Reich,

on the other” (264). The author is Distinguished Research Professor

of History at the Canadian Centre for German and European Studies

(York University). The author of the present review, a musicologist,

must express his gratitude to Professor Kater for helping to

make it professionally unacceptable to restrict oneself anymore to

“the music itself” when considering certain composers active in Germany

of the 1930s. By the same token, Kater’s reticence about “the

music itself” (which presumably springs from humility) will leave

many a musicologist itching to adduce (if not consult) the scores to

confirm or to contest Kater’s points, for Kater is writing about lives,

not works, unless the works have impinged on biographical issues.