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Mohammad Shahbazi

This article presents an account of a Qashqa'i health worker's upbringing, education and training, noting in particular his transition from life in a traditional nomadic family through completion of a formal education. The health worker, Jamal, describes certain problems of modernity and the personal conflict he faces as someone who loves his culture but also wants to see improvements in the health status of his people. Written by a Qashqa'i author, who brings his own sensitivity and cultural knowledge to the text, the article makes some recommendations about the training and integration of rural health workers in Iran.

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Bonee and Fitina

Mbororo Nomads Facing and Adapting to Conflict in Central Africa

Adamou Amadou

of previous conflicts and shocks. The question was whether and how this situation would still fit the model of nomadic pastoralists and their “culture of mobility” ( Adey 2009 ; de Bruijn 2007 ). In a culture of mobility, free and forced movements

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Moving Onward?

Secondary Movers on the Fringes of Refugee Mobility in Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya

Jolien Tegenbos and Karen Büscher

. The Turkana district is one of the poorest in the country and is sparsely populated by nomadic pastoralist communities, whose livelihoods have been profoundly influenced by the refugee presence. 19 The camp currently hosts more than 137,997 registered

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Places of Otherness

Comparing Eastleigh, Nairobi, and Xiaobei, Guangzhou, as Sites of South-South Migration

Neil Carrier and Gordon Mathews

colonial era, it also accommodated a substantial population of Kikuyus and others ( White 1990 ). Eastleigh had a Somali population from early on. While often seen as a nomadic pastoralist people ( Whittaker 2019 ), there is a long history of Somali

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Replenishing Milk Sons

Changing Kinship Practices among the Sahrāwī, North Africa

Konstantina Isidoros

. Both Sahrāwī male and female interlocutors felt strongly about asserting their logic and saw themselves as a population of highly specialised desert nomadic pastoralists who had occupied the western Sahara for at least three millennia. Milk kinship

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Ruth Mostern

receded over time, agriculture gave way to pastoralism, and nomadic pastoralists moved to better pasture. 3 Nevertheless, the region fluctuated between these modes of production from year to year and from place to place. Monsoons were generally heavy

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Frauke Mennes, John P. Hayes, David Kloos, Martha Lagace, Morten Koch Andersen, Somdeep Sen, Matthew Porges, and Sa’ed Atshan

with a host family into the nearby pasturelands, watching the refugees become nomadic pastoralists. These two identities—refugee and nomad— are frequently on display in Tindouf. Historically, each of the many nomadic groups who moved through this space