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Ramin Jahanbegloo

The article deals with Mohandas K. Gandhi's theory of democracy and its related civic practices. It indicates the relation between Gandhi's idea of civic duty and his idea of democracy, and argues that few would dispute that Gandhi was one of the most original and transformative thinkers of democracy. The article maintains that among his many notable contributions, Gandhi is rightly credited with emphasizing on the ideas of citizenship duty, truth in politics, genuine self-rule, and ethically enlightened democracy. In addition to advocating self-sustaining villages and communal cooperation, Gandhi developed an idea of non-liberal democracy reducing individualism, economic greed, and laissez-faire by insisting on a duty oriented and spiritually empowered participative democracy. Nearly seven decades after his death, Gandhi stands as one of the most significant and relevant non-Western theorist of democracy.

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Keith Alexander

Abstract

In October 1978, diverse members of the West Berlin Left founded the Alternative Liste für Demokratie und Umweltschutz (Alternative Ballot for Democracy and Environmental Protection, AL). This article examines the origins and evolution of the AL. Initially, the new political organization fundamentally opposed the parliamentary system. Within three years, however, the AL won a significant presence in the West Berlin Parliament, and in 1989, the party joined the Social Democrats in governing West Berlin. The AL’s parliamentary participation had a moderating, integrative effect on the party and its members. From the late 1970s through the end of the 1980s, a significant segment of the radical West German Left grew to accept parliamentary democracy, demonstrating the strength of the Federal Republic.

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Iain Sinclair

Warfare was widespread in classical India. Although the Buddhists of India abhorred killing, they could not evade or ignore war altogether. From the seventh century to the thirteenth century, various types of war magic, together with justifications for their use, developed in tantric Buddhist communities. Defensive types of war magic adhered to pacifist ethics and aimed to avoid, halt, or disperse armies. Harmful war magic was applied in the context of the transcendent ethics of enlightenment. Even when warfare was fully incorporated into Buddhist soteriology, non-violence remained a paramount virtue, and the scope of a just war was very limited. The present survey of tantric sources shows that tantric Buddhist war magic emerged as a reaction to the inevitability of war and was applied in the hope of mitigating warfare's excesses.

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Jerome Ravetz

In this essay I review my own involvement in climate science, and attempt to draw some useful lessons. I start with a critique of the theory of post-normal science (PNS). This is derived from the experience of the effective criticisms of PNS that were made on the blogosphere. I proceed to a critique of climate science itself, which might be described as the attempt to solve a post-normal problem by "normal science" methods. Since quality, in a variety of aspects, became crucial in the Climategate debates, I analyze that concept in the fraught context of a politicized, contested science. Such sciences have the seeds of tragedy for those who innocently engage with them believing that their task is simply to speak truth to power. Finally, out of my personal history I suggest that we keep in mind the personal investment of anyone holding a contested view, and respect their struggles to maintain integrity when their core beliefs are under attack. This motivates the fostering of non-violence in debates on policy science issues.

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Editorial

Girlhood Studies at 10

Claudia Mitchell

postings. GHS 10(2) will explore technologies of non-violence and, in so doing, recognize the politics of the world around us right now, commemorate Jackie Kirk and her activist agenda in seeking to combat violence, and consider what girlhood studies can

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Free from State Violence or Free to Comply?

A Revised Typology of Coercion and Repression in Liberal Democracies

Barbora Capinska

making [the] contingency visible,” hegemonic repressions help persist “the patterns of (oppressive) behavior even when the contingency that underlies sedimented power relations has been pointed out” ( Glynos 2001: 199) . Non-Violence as Counterargument

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Dustin William Louie

the threat of social media for Indigenous girls. Joseph Bock (2012) contends that technologies of non-violence have the greatest potential in early warning systems that can be applied in a range of social media and other technologies. However, since

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Afterword

So What Is the Anthropology of Buddhism About?

David N. Gellner

long ago. Furthermore, detachment and non-violence are part and parcel of Buddhism’s radical soteriological stance (perhaps Weber was not so wrong after all), and this means that everywhere Buddhism is connected to death and the afterlife. Nonetheless

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City Sterilization and Poverty Management

Examining a Mobility Hub in the “Redevelopment and Enhancement” of Downtown Tallahassee

Christopher M. McLeod, Matthew I. Horner, Matthew G. Hawzen and Mark DiDonato

, Homelessness in America: A Forced March to Nowhere (Washington, DC: Community for Creative Non-Violence, 1983). 14 DeVerteuil, “The Local State and Homeless Shelters,” 109–120. 15 Joshua Evans, “Exploring the (Bio)political Dimensions of Voluntarism and Care

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L’Aimé qui est l’aimée

Can Levinas’ Beloved Be Queer?

Robin Podolsky

requires the possibility of violence, but it is not born out of violence, rather from interhuman expression, the voice of the Good. Levinas knows full well, of course, that this violence, born out of non-violence, can become very brutal very quickly. He