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Painting the Painter

Meta-Representation and Magic Realism in Joann Sfar's Chagall en Russie

Fabrice Leroy

French cartoonist and filmmaker Joann Sfar has often used the comics medium to reflect on visual representation. His latest bande dessinée, Chagall en Russie ['Chagall in Russia'] (2010-2011), continues some of the meta-pictural elements previously found in his Pascin (2000-2002), which already featured Chagall in several episodes, as well as his acclaimed series, The Rabbi's Cat, where Sfar introduced the character of an anonymous Russian painter, whose biography and artistic stance seemingly referred to that of Marc Chagall. Although Chagall en Russie explicitly refers to the real-life Franco-Russian modernist painter, it is certainly not a standard biographical exercise. By offering a synthetic and often symbolic version of personal and historical events experienced by Chagall, Sfar takes certain liberties with the painter's life story as it was outlined by the artist (in My Life, his 1922 autobiography) and by many biographers and art historians. Sfar does not seek an authentic depiction of his subject's verifiable life journey, but rather views it through a metaphorical narrative, which is itself inspired by Chagall's artistic universe and raises questions about the figurative possibilities of comics.

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‘Off Path, Counter Path’

Contemporary Walking Collaborations in Landscape, Art and Poetry

Harriet Tarlo and Judith Tucker

formal, colourist and conceptual reappraisal of Sutherland and Paul Nash. Her large paintings of Brimham Rocks and Ilkey Moor were made after forays into the landscape; her sensitivity to architectural space and the grand scale of her work meant that the

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150 Years of Algerian Painting

Relevance for Understanding the Postcolonial Situation

François Pouillon

Precisely because the Maghreb rejects if not the contribution at least the spirit of the colonial period and claims to have access, above and beyond that period, to more ancient continuities, it invites the observer to meditate on certain constants we had lost sight of, and on the temporal vicissitudes that affect those constants. — Jacques Berque, 1965

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Craig San Roque

This article explores the relationship of Central Australian 'Dreaming', or Tjukurrp, to symbol and thought formation in Aboriginal culture. Acknowledgment is given to ethnographic and indigenous descriptions of Tjukurrp and to Aboriginal mythopoeia, but the author is primarily concerned with how thoughts are made and what they are made of. Comparisons are drawn to European myths and cults in order to understand how Tjukurrp and myth might influence intercultural transference. The author suggests that through an anthropological and psychoanalytical analysis of intercultural conversations and an understanding of Tjukurrp's structure and content, non-indigenous people working in health and law might appreciate and comprehend Aboriginal thinking and thus be more effective in various aspects of engagement. In this meditation on thought formation and failure, the author seeks to understand the relationships between Aboriginals and non-Aboriginals, so that those who intend to help do not end up destroying.

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Peter Eli Gordon

Daniel Arasse, Anselm Kiefer, Mary Whittall, trans. (New York: Harry N. Abrams, 2001)

Lisa Saltzman, Anselm Kiefer and Art after Auschwitz (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999)

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Painting, Self, and Society at the Cusp of Abstraction

Comments on Art and Comparative Cultural History

Debora Silverman

It is very gratifying, at the end of the long journey this book entailed, to have responses generated from two fields and from some of the scholars whose writings have inspired me along the way. What I’d like to do in my comments is not to rehash material in the book—I hope those of you who haven’t yet will get a chance to read it. (It is now available in a paperback edition.) Rather, I’d like to raise some broader issues for our future work relating to the position of navigating between the disciplines of art history and cultural history as we try to write in the links between biography, society, and style in specific national contexts, and the particular benefits of comparative analysis as we do so.

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More than Darkness Preservation

The Importance of the Dark, Star-Filled Skies in Urban Areas

Yee-Man Lam

to advance the discussion of light and darkness by introducing the importance of stars. The article will examine the imaginative portrayals of stars and darkness in a photography series by Thierry Cohen and two paintings by Vincent van Gogh. By

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Hugh Underhill, Jeremy Rowe, and Michael Murphy

Painting the Town HUGH UNDERHILL

‘Twelfth Night’ Rehearsal of a String Quartet: St. Gregory’s, once a Church JEREMY ROWE

The Fox and The Crow MICHAEL MURPHY

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Competing Visions

The Visual Culture of the Congo Free State and Fin de Siècle Europe

Matthew G. Stanard

: Popular Painting , a collaboration of BOZAR and the AfricaMuseum that was curated by Bambi Ceuppens and Sammy Baloji, both of African heritage. 1 Considering the enduring attention to central Africa in Belgium and ongoing attempts to come to grips with

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Contingency and Constraint

African-American Migration as Seen through Jacob Lawrence's “Migration” Series

Deborah Breen

Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) 11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019 http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2015/onewayticket/ Admission: USD 25/18/14 “I pick up my life, / And take it with me, / And I put it down in Chicago, Detroit, / Buff alo, Scranton, / Any place that is / North and East, / And not Dixie.” Th ese are the opening lines from “One-Way Ticket,” by African-American poet, Langston Hughes (1902–1967). Th e poem provides the emotional and historical core of the “Migration” paintings by Jacob Lawrence (1917–2000), a series that depicts the extraordinary internal migration of African Americans in the twentieth century. Not coincidentally, the poem also provides the title of the current exhibition of the sixty paintings in Lawrence’s series, on display at MoMA, New York, from 3 April to 7 September 2015.1 Shown together for the first time in over twenty years, the paintings are surrounded by works that provide context for the “great migration”: additional paintings by Lawrence, as well as paintings, drawings, photographs, texts, and musical recordings by other African-American artists, writers, and performers of the early to mid-twentieth century.