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Scoping Recursivity

A Comment on Franklin and Napier

Martin Holbraad

Commenting on two articles that have appealed to the notion of 'recursivity' to articulate new directions for anthropological thinking, this piece seeks to clarify the scope of a recursive turn in contemporary anthropology, distinguishing it from elements of recursivity that have always been present in the discipline's epistemic procedures.

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Dora Verus Dora

Exploding the Myth in Wise Children

Judy Hayden

'A woman attends a funeral. The coffin is lowered into the grave. A man approaches her and says, "He was not your father."' Thus begins a book, On Birth and Madness, by Eric Rhode, an opening reproduced in a review by Angela Carter. In this 'wayward and infuriating book', Carter observes, Rhode is remarkably absorbed by paternity, by Oedipus, by Hamlet and by Freud's LIttle Hans – in a book which ostensibly addresses maternity. Whose child we are, our paternity, Carter counters, is a 'profoundly absurd question' ('Rhode', 202–03).

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Suzanne Desan Cultural Revolutions: Everyday Life and Politics in Britain, North America, and France by Leora Auslander

Ivan Jablonka Contested Paternity: Constructing Families in Modern France by Rachel G. Fuchs

Seth Armus Future Tense: The Culture of Anticipation in France between the Wars by Roxanne Panchasi

Peter Soppelsa The Heroic City: Paris 1945–1958 by Rosemary Wakeman

William Poulin-Deltour Living in Arcadia: Homosexuality, Politics and Morality in France from the Liberation to AIDS by Julian Jackson

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Conflicting Notions of Continuity and Belonging

Assisted Reproduction, Law, and Practices in Norway

Marit Melhuus

This article explores the interface between law, technology, and practices. More specifically, it addresses how biotechnologies—in particular, reproductive technologies—move people in different ways. Taking as its point of departure certain restrictions in the Norwegian biotechnology law, it explores changes in procreative practices and their implications for understandings of notions of belonging. This is tied to a gradual shift in meaning of the concepts of paternity and maternity, which in turn has ramifications for kinship and hence fundamental ideas of relatedness. Two premises underpin the arguments: first, that law is a cultural artifact productive of meaning, and, second, that as a social phenomenon, biotechnologies bring to the fore fundamental moral dilemmas.

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Bruno Schulz's Literary Adoptees

Jewishness and Literary Father-Child Relationships in Cynthia Ozick's and David Grossmann's Fiction

Bruno Arich-Gerz

In a speculatively intertextual way, Bruno Schulz's disappeared manuscript The Messiah re-appears in Cynthia Ozick's The Messiah of Stockholm (1987) and See Under: Love by David Grossmann (1989). Deeply concerned with the late effects of the Holocaust on survivors and their (grand) children, the two books either feature Schulz as the alleged father of Ozick's protagonist or refer to him and his oeuvre as crucial for Grossmann's hero Momik's project of writing the life and Holocaust survival story of 'Grandfather Anshel'. Models from literary theory which allow for a framing of Schulz's imaginary paternity and his adaptation by and through fictional adoptees range from trauma theory in Grossmann's case to discussions of 'original' works as opposed to plagiarism and forgery in that of Ozick's.

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Margit Berner

This article focuses on interwar Austrian physical anthropology, tracing its scientific aspirations, gradual institutionalization, and wider popularization during the interwar period. Largely concentrated in Vienna, Austrian physical anthropologists debated racial questions extensively and conducted racial evaluations based on detailed morphological studies and in-depth analysis of facial "racial" traits. This method was considered ideal for genealogical studies. A host of new societies and working groups collaborated to develop new methodologies and create influential links to universities and public institutions. Within this context, a certificate or "proof of paternity" was developed to resolve disputed court cases. Not only did issuing these certificates become a key source of work and income for anthropologists and their organizations, they also marked the discipline's crucial shift from a theoretical to an applied science.

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“Girls Are Like Flowers; Boys Are Like footballs”

How Fathers Hope to Configure Their Sons’ Masculinity

Florencia Herrera

). In Chile, Olavarría ( 2001a , 2001b ) has developed a line of research about paternity, attempting to identify the local characteristics of hegemonic masculinity. According to Olavarría, paternity—and men's role as providers—are still essential in

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Mishlei/Proverbs

Weaving the Web of Wisdom

Lindsey Taylor-Guthartz

female teacher, but regard them as ‘the voices of women who have internalized this [andocentric] discourse’, 6 playing along with patriarchal concerns to protect paternity and control female sexuality. As Alice Bellis points out, however, it is difficult

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Alex Link

details as the need for Laurie to breathe (9.3), though it does help her to see the pattern that reveals her paternity. Laurie’s is so narrow that its uniqueness brings Jon back to Earth, but out of curiosity concerning the gaps in his knowledge, not love

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Repaying the Debts of the Dead

Kinship, Microfinance, and Mortuary Practice on the Paraguayan Frontier

Caroline E. Schuster

market speculation, McKinnon suggests that “the analogy that focuses on the power of paternity (and fraternity) to mobilize more ‘natural’ female resources through the enterprising spirit of the market is not ‘just’ a metaphor but an analogy central to