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Safe milk and risky quinoa

The lottery and precarity of farming in Peru

Astrid B. Stensrud

Peasantry: A Preliminary Discussion,” Eric Wolf described the peasant as aiming for subsistence, not reinvestment, while the farmer in his definition, “views agriculture as a business enterprise” (1955: 454). In today's Majes however, the difference

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Alison K. Smith

whether movement to Siberia should be considered permanent. The Siberian governor had presented the Senate with a number of questions in a report. The first issue was that “in towns in Siberia, many people from the peasantry and the merchant estate have

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Sandra Langley

Discourse-based analysis continues to be thought of, in some quarters, in overgeneralizing terms. In this article, I emphasize that all instances of it do not share the same suppositions, and I demonstrate its purchase for a critical but nuanced revisiting of processes of national liberation and development. I present support for some of the conclusions that I advanced in an earlier study (Langley 2001), which examines post-1979 Sandinismo as a dispositif within modernity. Ultimately, I focus upon contrasting discourses of the literacy campaign that place Sandinismo in time and space as well as within a historical particularity. I consider how these discourses relate to the ways in which the most marginalized sectors of campesinos (peasants) fared in the context of the Sandinista project. The manner in which they had been ‘spoken’ about shaped and delimited how they ‘spoke’ and might have ‘spoken.’

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Campesinos del Nudo del Paramillo

Entre la guerra y el desarrollismo

Andrés Tavera Franco

*Full article is in Spanish

English abstract: This article examines collective actions led by peasant communities in the Paramillo Massif in Colombia. It juxtaposes these locally defined development proposals focused on maintaining the balance between society and the environment with dominant neoliberal development models implemented by the Colombian State that promote developmentalism and seemingly exacerbate armed conflict in the country. The article frames this analysis within the context of political ecology, with the purpose of questioning the ideological bases for large-scale development that negatively impacts local communities both socially and environmentally.

Spanish abstract: Este artículo examina acciones colectivas lideradas por comunidades campesinas en el Nudo del Paramillo, Colombia. El autor yuxtapone estas propuestas de desarrollo definidas localmente centradas en mantener el equilibrio entre la sociedad y el medio ambiente, con modelos dominantes de desarrollo neoliberal implementados por el Estado colombiano que promueven el desarrollismo y aparentemente exacerban los conflictos armados en el país. El artículo enmarca este análisis dentro del contexto de la ecología política, con el propósito de cuestionar las bases ideológicas para el desarrollo a gran escala que impacta negativamente a las comunidades locales tanto social como ambientalmente.

French abstract: Cet article examine les actions collectives menées par des communautés paysannes du Nudo del Paramillo, en Colombie. Il juxtapose les propositions de développement définies à l’échelle locale et centrées sur le maintien d’un équilibre entre la société et l’environnement avec les modèles de développement néolibéral mis en oeuvre par l’État colombien qui promeuvent le développementalisme et exacerbent apparemment le conflit armé dans le pays. L’article formule cette analyse dans le contexte de l’écologie politique, dans le but de questionner les bases idéologiques d’un développement à grande échelle qui a des impacts négatifs sur les communautés aussi bien sur le plan social qu’environnemental.

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The New Rural Home

Gender and Rural Modernization in Postwar France

Sheila Nowinski

After World War II, France’s rural Catholic youth associations (Jeunesse agricole catholique [JAC] and its sister organization, Jeunesse agricole catholique féminine [JACF]) organized a traveling home expo for agrarian families. The Rural Home Expo promoted a vision of rural modernization that drew on gendered models of postwar consumerism, economic development, and Catholic teaching on the family. The new rural home envisioned by JAC helped popularize and advance policies to industrialize French agriculture. By the mid-1950s, female activists resisted the gendered division of labor on which this vision was based. In 1957, JACF shifted its mission to promote women’s participation in the agricultural profession.

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Spaces for Transdisciplinary Dialogues on the Relationship between Local Communities and Their Environment

The Case of a Rural Community in the Calchaquí Valley (Salta, Argentina)

Marta Crivos, María Rosa Martínez, Laura Teves, and Carolina Remorini

Abstract

Our ethnographic research focuses on the perception and use of components of the natural environment in terms of routine activities carried out by the residents of a rural community in the Calchaqui Valley (Salta, Argentina). Life in this community is characterised by the presence of traditional subsistence activities – agriculture, cattle farming, textile manufacturing and ancestral medical practices – coexisting with business ventures focused on mono-culture and export, tourism centred on landscape intervention and promotion of native products, and the growing key role of public policies in the areas of health and human development. In this context, a joint reflection on viability and sustainability of local and global practices and resources must be undertaken. Implementing intersectoral forums and focus-group discussions, governmental and non-governmental actors, researchers and local people must work conjointly to achieve a fresh patrimonial awareness of livelihood strategies based on their long interaction with a specific environment.

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Aaron Kappeler

existence.” — Vladimir Lenin, The Development of Capitalism in Russia In this article, I advance an analysis that is ambivalent with regard to the peasantry in the Venezuelan Andes, suggesting these actors are the precipitates of the process of uneven

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“Completely Useless“

Exiling the Disabled to Tsarist Siberia

Andrew A. Gentes

The ostracizing of mentally and physically disabled individuals is a cross-cultural phenomenon that amounts to what Henri-Jacques Stiker calls a “murderous system,“ which does not kill such individuals outright, but instead indirectly. This as well as Foucault's notions about the construction of madness and deviancy serve as a departure point for understanding tsarist Russia's murderous system of deporting the disabled to Siberia. This article charts this system's operation over the longue durée, from the midsixteenth to the late nineteenth century; describes the motivations and factors conditioning those powerbrokers who exiled the disabled; and provides data on the number of disabled exiles and describes conditions they faced. I argue that the state's exploitation of the peasantry, the peasantry's inculcation of commodifying economic imperatives, and the availability of Siberia's expanses combined to make Russia's a uniquely murderous system that lasted for centuries.

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Geoff Kennedy

This article examines the development of popular discourses of liberty as independence emerging from the struggles between peasants and landlords over the course of the late medieval and early modern periods. This discourse, relating to the aspirations of the dependent peasantry for free status, free tenure, and free labor, articulated a conception of independence that overlapped with the emerging republican discourse of the seventeenth century. However, whereas republicanism focuses almost exclusively on the arbitrary powers of the monarchical state, the popular tradition emphasizes freedom from the arbitrary powers of landlordism. After a brief introduction to the republican conception of liberty and a discussion of the dependent peasantry in England, the work of Gerrard Winstanley is presented as an innovative synthesis of popular and republican discourses of freedom as independence from the arbitrary powers of exploitation.

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David Meek

I focus on the role of agroecology in rural proletarian social movements in this article. First, I highlight these movements' conception of agroecology as an important element of their political ideology. Second, I explore the value of agroecology in helping maintain the permanence of the peasantry. Third, I show that rural proletarian movements emphasize agroecology because it is key to attaining sovereignty. I draw upon the geographic lenses of territory, the production of space, and autonomous geographies in positing these arguments. Throughout the article, I draw upon a case study of the Brazilian Landless Workers Movement, one of the most vocal agroecological social movements, to illustrate these arguments.