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Is Germany Part of the West?

A Reconstruction of Russian Narratives

Maren Rohe

Introduction In Russia, the perception of Germany, which this special issue explores, is closely connected to perceptions of Europe and the West. While Russians have traditionally seen Germany as part of Europe, they have been more reluctant

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Perceptions of German Leadership

Irish National Identity and Germany as a “Significant Other” during the Euro Crisis

Charlotte Galpin

Gerhard Schröder's time in office, Germany's role in Europe has been considered to have become more “normal,” characterized by a more explicit pursuit of German national interests in contrast to the common “European” interest. 18 The perception of German

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Valeria V. Vasilyeva

Abstract

The International Siberian Studies Conference (Sibirskiie Chteniia) is organized by the Siberian Department of Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography, the renowned Kunstkamera, once every three years in Saint Petersburg. The conference this year, the tenth, was devoted to emotions, feelings and perception in the North and Siberia. This year, all sessions of the Conference took place in the main building of Russian Geographic Society (RGS), an institution with a long history of geographic and ethnographic research in Siberia, and the atmosphere created by the historical interior of RGS contributed greatly to the success of the event.

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From Perception to Action

Sartre's Practical Phenomenology

Blake D. Scott

perception. By focusing on Sartre's notion of the project, I argue instead that the problem posed by the example is better understood at the level of action. In support of this interpretation, I conclude with a brief comparison to the early work of Paul

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Ana Isabel González Manso

Since the late eighteenth century various perceptions of living in a new time, different from the past one, have coexisted in Spain. This suggests that the past was also seen and revisited in different ways. This article sets out to investigate how

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M. Guadalupe Torres-Jiménez, Rene Murrieta-Galindo, Beatriz Bolívar-Cimé, Astrid Wojtarowski-Leal, and M. Ángeles Piñar-Álvarez

huge colonies of thousands of individuals, provide significant biomass to ecological systems in the form of manure (guano) ( Voigt & Kingston, 2016 ). People's perceptions of wild bats in farming areas vary according to their experience, attitudes

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Sol Neely

This Screen Shot section includes three texts—an interview and two articles—that, together, occasion an unsettling movement in the development of an Indigenous phenomenology staged upon Screen Bodies’ concern for the critical tryptic experience, perception, and display. Such phenomenology, moreover, takes shape in the spirit of an enduring and persistent Indigenous cosmopolitanism, one organized by an appeal to a pan-tribal solidarity that is also not shy about drawing from efficacious sources of critique internal to European critical traditions. Together, these texts—and the source materials that inspire them—build rich ecumenical perspectives in the service of decolonial justice and pedagogy. And while the texts included here are composed in English, each draws from and references Indigenous languages, articulating one kind of Indigenous cosmopolitanism that makes use of English as a kind of “trade language.” To stage an Indigenous phenomenology by appeal to an Indigenous cosmopolitanism, in our contemporary political moment, thus calls for critical attention attuned to the perspectives, traditions, and imaginations of what Tlingit poet and author Ernestine Hayes describes as “Indigenous intellectual authority.” In this spirit, Indigenous cosmopolitanism occasions a decolonial-critical cosmopolitanism rooted not in the secular, Habermasian cosmopolitanism of Europe but in the modalities of consciousness, the literary genius and acumen, of Indigenous oral literary traditions. In the context of such a cosmopolitanism in which everyone is variably situated, across the spectrum that divides descendants of perpetrators and victims of settler colonialism, the critical imperative becomes a decolonial one, and non-Indigenous readers are called to shed the epistemological, ontological, and political priorities that broadly characterize European analytical and continental traditions, whatever their internal debates may be. Such an imperative forces phenomenological attention not only on the macrological instantiations of settler-colonial power but also against the “micrological textures of power” that ultimately shape the inner contours of self and, thus, what becomes phenomenologically legible to individuals situated in their cultural contexts.

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Sensory Perception of Rock Art in East Siberia and the Far East

Soviet Archeological “Discoveries” and Indigenous Evenkis

Donatas Brandišauskas

linked to the indigenous perception of rock art sites as well as compare it to existing knowledge. My research also shows that contemporary indigenous Evenki reindeer herders and hunters living in remote villages, as well as nomadic taiga camps have been

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Andrea Butcher

, claims to individual agency and rational resource management. This obscures indigenous perceptions of cosmology, hierarchy and the ritual mediation of a vital geography, all of which are crucial to the successes of worldly activities. Thus, the outcome or

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Mobile Perception and the Automotive Prosthetic

Photoconceptualism, the Car, and the Posthuman Subject

Charissa N. Terranova

This essay focuses on a body of photoconceptual works from the 1960s and 1970s in which the automobile functions as a prosthetic-like aperture through which to view the world in motion. I argue that the logic of the “automotive prosthetic“ in works by Paul McCarthy, Dennis Hopper, Ed Ruscha, Jeff Wall, John Baldessari, Richard Prince, Martha Rosler, Robert Smithson, Ed Kienholz, Julian Opie, and Cory Arcangel reveals a techno-genetic understanding of conceptual art, functioning in addition and alternatively to semiotics and various philosophies of language usually associated with conceptual art. These artworks show how the automobile, movement on roads and highways, and the automotive landscape of urban sprawl have transformed the human sensorium. I surmise that the car has become a prosthetic of the human body and is a technological force in the maieusis of the posthuman subject. I offer a reading of specific works of photoconceptual art based on experience, perception, and a posthumanist subjectivity in contrast to solely understanding them according to semiotics and linguistics.