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Intimate Passports

The Subversive Performances of Tanja Ostojić

Jehanne-Marie Gavarini

The article explores the artwork of Tanja Ostojić, an interdisciplinary artist from Serbia who uses performance art to examine social and political issues. Ostojić in particu- lar expresses the migrant woman’s perspective when facing today’s world of political and economic inequities. With caustic humor, the artist examines who occupies cen- ter positions and who remains in the margins. Ostojić’s subversive performances blur the boundaries between art and life. Her use of her own body, personal history, and identity reflects a feminist perspective. Placing Ostojić’s work in the longer history of performance art, this article analyzes how this provocative artist pushes the boundar- ies of art and culture by denouncing the power dynamics that rule exclusive systems such as the Western-dominated art world and the European Union.

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Inventing the Suffragettes

Anachronism, Gnosticism and Corporeality in Contemporary Fiction

Katharine Cockin

The longevity of the ‘suffragette’ as a sign of rebellion and dissidence in contemporary British culture is significant.1 Anachronistic citations of the ‘suffragettes’, in novels such as Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason (1999), My Life on a Plate (2000), Kingdom Swann (1990), Suffragette City (1999), the film Mary Poppins (1964) and the performance art of Leslie Hill, invite closer inspection. For the female political subject, the body was a site of ideological conflict during the British campaigns for women’s suffrage in the early years of the twentieth century and it continues to haunt feminist subjectivities and gender transgressors. Ever since members of the militant Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU), formed in 1903 and led by Emmeline Pankhurst, became known as the ‘suffragettes’ they have been mythologised and reinvented for different purposes. The suffragettes have persisted in popular culture, but perversely reduced to a name and a fatal action: Pankhurst, and that woman who threw herself under the horse. In her investigation of the representation and memorialisation of Emmeline Pankhurst in the period 1930–93, Laura E. Nym Mayhall (1999) has established that the ‘suffragette’ became a ‘symbol of modernity’, a ‘symbol of women’s political activism more generally’, privileging a particular understanding of militancy: ‘militant action, defined narrowly as violence against property, through arrest to incarceration and, eventually, the hunger-strike and forcible feeding’. Mayhall rightly emphasises the constructedness of these representations, and demonstrates the pre-eminence of Emmeline Pankhurst as a signifier of the ‘suffragette’.

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M.I.A. in the Global Youthscape

Rethinking Girls' Resistance and Agency in Postcolonial Contexts

Lisa Weems

In this article I explore the performance art of international hip-hop artist M.I.A. to interrogate the problematic of girls' resistance and agency within a global youthscape. Using a feminist transnational framework, I analyze how her music and celebrity persona may be considered gendered post-colonial cultural productions that highlight issues of inequality, violence and domination. I argue that M.I.A.'s cultural productions serve as pedagogical symbolic resources for theorizing girlhood in post-colonial contexts specifically around issues of sexuality. As a symbolic resource, M.I.A.'s work is pedagogical in the larger global youthscape as well as in scholarship on girls in post-colonial contexts. Specifically, M.I.A. (in her music and interviews) openly wrestles with the embodied tensions between complicity and possibility in post-colonial girlhood. Consistent with a feminist transnational framework, I argue that the identities of “Third World” girls are discursively produced as innocent yet hypersexualized exotic Others in the service and/or mercy of “First World” colonial men and women. However, M.I.A. makes explicit that within the context of globalization, the cultural politics of gender and sexuality take place on/through/with brown female bodies—whether it is in the battlefield, the street or in the bedroom. A close analysis M.I.A.'s song 10 Dollar illustrates how Third World girls exercise resistance and agency in negotiating imperialist and nationalist heteropatriarchy.

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Sheila K. Hoffman, Sarita Sundar, Masaaki Morishita, Fabien Van Geert, and Sharon Ann Holt

. It was easy enough for me to imagine that the tableau I witnessed at the waterfront was “performance art.” The innocent, if serendipitous, coming together of a uniformed person of authority and a shrouded, crouched figure within that visualized stage

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“They don’t even know how to copy”

The discourse on originality in Albania’s art world

Sofia Kalo

, citation, odd conjunctures, pastiches, and other playful and ironic values tend to govern contemporary, postmodern production and taste. As a result, pop art, Earth art, installation art, performance art, pattern-and-decoration, photorealism, multimedia art

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After the Party

Trump, Le Pen, and the New Normal

Anne Sa’adah

use violence”…. Last spring, this was a kind of right-wing performance art. Now it is the language of the man leading in the Republican polls, a man who … could, not inconceivably, become President of the United States. Imagine that. 39 Gingrich

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Manuel Stoffers, Blake Morris, Alan Meyer, Younes Saramifar, Andrew Cobbing, Martin Emanuel, Rudi Volti, Caitlin Starr Cohn, Caitríona Leahy, and Sunny Stalter-Pace

wide array of artistic practices that combine walking and mapping. As her research demonstrates, artists interested in walking emerge from a variety of artistic disciplines—sculpture, performance art, and digital art are just a few of the disciplines

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India Halstead

, existentialist style (see Krens 1993 ). In the 1940s and 1950s, artists such as Yves Klein began experimenting with new forms of performance art: pieces that strove to reduce, more than ever, the distance between artist and viewer. Into the 1960s, performance

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Never Mind the Ballots

The Edible Ballot Society and the Performance of Citizenship

Matthew Hayes

, carnival, and the act of citizenship that made the ballot eating effective. On the surface, the EBS protests appear to be a form of spectacle; some would call it an act verging on performance art, others merely a stunt. But, as Bakhtin writes, carnival