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On the Notion of Historical (Dis)Continuity

Reinhart Koselleck's Construction of the Sattelzeit

Gabriel Motzkin

The author contends that a transition period is conceived in terms of its continuity with preceding or subsequent periods, rather than an entirely discontinuous temporal unit. Thus, in order to conceive of a period of transition, one must assume an overarching historical continuity. This contrasts with Reinhart Koselleck's and Michel Foucault's conception of the period of transition to modernity which is at once a break and part of the modern period. By analyzing how time is experienced in terms of contemporary awareness and retrospective consciousness, the author maps out the epistemological determinations that allow for the conception of a period of transition to modernity such as Sattelzeit.

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Political Regeneration

José Bonifácio and Temporal Experiences in the Luso-American World in the Early Nineteenth Century

Maria Elisa Noronha De Sá and Marcelo Gantus Jasmin

incorporates elements that can be associated with either a traditional or a modern view of time, without attributing any inconsistency to the actor. We conceive this complex temporal experience as characteristic of periods of transition, but it may be that this

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“SpiritS Follow the words”

Stories as Spirit Traces among the Khmu of Northern Laos

Rosalie Stolz

vegetables are among the items most frequently tabooed because their transience, symbolized by their green color, is assumed to put the already vulnerable periods of transition (here the inauguration of the harvest) under additional risk. 11 While sorcery

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Book Reviews

Naomi J. Andrews, Simon Jackson, Jessica Wardhaugh, Shannon Fogg, Jessica Lynne Pearson, Elizabeth Campbell, Laura Levine Frader, Joshua Cole, Elizabeth A. Foster, and Owen White

postwar years in black and white. As in all periods of transition, the past competes with the present. This was certainly true with respect to changing conceptions of motherhood in the 1950s. Observers such as the psychiatrist Marie-Hélène Revault d