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The End Is Where We Start From

Communicating the Impact of a Family Music Project to Wider Audiences

Jude Robinson

There has been increasing pressure for anthropologists to communicate their ideas and thinking to new publics and so actively engage in national and international debates relating to their field. However, this is not an unproblematic practice and the politics of representation requires anthropologists to consider the sometimes conflicting dimensions of the moral, ethical, political, social, personal and academic. My fieldwork with families linked to In Harmony Liverpool, a children's music project in England, involved inviting participants variously to take part in interviews, draw maps of musical sites in their homes, construct playlists of favourite songs and take photographs of sites in their homes where music 'happens'. As my aim is to produce a visual and audio display to communicate with wider audiences, I consider the issues of representation, authenticity, potential damage and 'othering' in the planning of the research and how this shaped data collection and the plans for dissemination.

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Politicizing Elsewhere(s)

Negotiating Representations of Neo-Pentecostal Aesthetic Practice in Berlin

Dominik Mattes

researcher's positionality and politics of representation” (Kasmani et al., this volume), a concern raised by the editors of this special section. Questions of power and Othering inherent in studying and writing about religious aesthetics 2 are

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Dis-orienting Western Knowledge

Coloniality, Curriculum and Crisis

Zeus Leonardo

Abstract

The decolonization movement is a knowledge project insofar as colonialism was an epistemological form of imperialism. As such, curricular change in the primary grades to university life requires a fundamental reworking of theories of knowledge, if not knowledge itself. To interrogate this problem and pose possible interventions, this article explicates Edward Said’s conceptualization of colonialism as taking place on an epistemic level that orients western knowledge towards non-western ways through a will to dominate. Extending beyond the administrative colonial era, coloniality in the modern era, more appropriately called postcoloniality, transforms as a knowledge relation. Decolonization requires dis-orienting this relationship through Said’s methodology. Finally, the article argues that a ‘travelling curriculum’ poses an alternative against the dominant mode of knowledge that aims to fix and essentialize people, ultimately opening up the known world towards processes of co-existence.

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The Girl in the Mirror

The Psychic Economy of Class in the Discourse of Girlhood Studies

Valerie Hey

This article questions Angela McRobbie's recent text The Aftermath of Feminism: Gender, Culture and Social Change because it creates some interesting new vocabulary for understanding late modernity's revised sexual and cultural politics. Whilst acknowledging the sophistication of its cultural studies-inspired argument, I consider some consequences of this reading. If theory also performs as a politics of representation, I ask what happens if, in accounting for post-feminism, the theoretical status of class as an antagonistic relation is diminished. I suggest what gender and education discourses can add to a reading of 'new times'.

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Duncan M. Campbell, Alison Petch, Sarah-Neel Smith, Ryan Brown-Haysom, and Nélia Dias

DENTON, Kirk A., Exhibiting the Past: Historical Memory and the Politics of Museums in Postsocialist China

LU, Tracey L.-D., Museums in China: Power, Politics, and Identities VARUTTI, Marzia, Museums in China: The Politics of Representation after Mao

HARRISON, Rodney, et al., eds., Reassembling the Collection: Ethnographic Museums and Indigenous Agency

MEJCHER-ATASSI, Sonja, and John Pedro SCHWARTZ, eds., Archives, Museums, and Collecting Practices in the Modern Arab World

PAINE, Crispin, Religious Objects in Museums: Private Lives and Public Duties

WINTLE, Claire, Colonial Collecting and Display: Encounters with Material Culture from the Andaman and Nicobar Islands

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Report

A Compassionate Look

Ryan Schowen

outside of formally sanctioned truth regimes. Although the exhibit manages a complex mediation of dialectical tensions without neatly resolving them, it risks sliding into an uneasy politics of representation. In its dual goals of social engagement

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Speaking Back, Striking Back

Calls for Local Agency and Good Fieldwork in Development Encounters

Eugenie Reidy

show, development anthropology is able to reveal the politics of representation in action, and show how the agendas that shape knowledge can leave little room for local voices to speak back. Yet it is also good at showing the limits of this. In this

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Introduction

Oceans

Amelia Moore and Jerry K. Jacka

involved in oceanic big data networks and the implications of the politics of representation in these human networks. In “New Materialist Approaches to Fisheries,” Lauren Drakopulos examines the complexities of the concept of “bycatch”—a term that often

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Documenting Sea Change

Ocean Data Technologies, Sciences, and Governance

Kathleen M. Sullivan

data portals have generated their own literature, which I will discuss later, along with the politics of representation. Observational and interpretive technologies are often used seamlessly in conjunction with each other, and making that happen is a

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Lieke Hettinga and Terrance Wooten

the politics of representation; rather, they end on the work of migrant and trans and queer justice organizers and collectives, such as Jennicet Gutiérrez and Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement, which have been documenting the gender sexual