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Evolution of the Depiction of Telephone Calls in Popular Movies

James E. Cutting

.002 But documentaries are rarely “popularmovies, and neither are adult films. So I eliminated both. In addition, not all film scholars regard film noir as a separate genre (see Schrader 1972 ; Gürkan 2015 ), so I folded those into drama. And the genres

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Shot Durations, Shot Classes, and the Increased Pace of Popular Movies

James E. Cutting and Ayse Candan

This article investigates historical trends of mean shot durations in 9,400 English-language and 1,550 non-English-language movies released between 1912 and 2013. For the sound-era movies of both sets there is little evidence indicating anything other than a linear decline plotted on a logarithmic scale, with the English-language set providing stronger results. In a subsample of 24 English-language movies from 1940 to 2010 the decline in shot duration is uniform across 15 shot classes, a result that supports a broad “evolutionary” account of film change. The article also explores the proportions of these shot classes across years and genres, with the results showing that 25 percent of the decline in shot duration is due to a shift away from shot classes with longer-than-average shot durations towards those with shorter-than-average durations, and 8 percent of the decline is due to the increased use of shot scales in which characters appear larger.

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Précis of Movies on Our Minds

James E. Cutting

Movies on Our Minds discusses biological and psychological underpinnings that constrain the physical form of popular movies. It summarizes and extends empirical research that my students and I conducted over a dozen years, published in three

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Shaping Edits, Creating Fractals

A Cinematic Case Study

James E. Cutting and Karen Pearlman

half a second, which is in the upper-normal range of heartrates and footfalls; and shots in contemporary popular movies have a mean duration of about four seconds ( Cutting et al. 2011 ; Salt 2009 ), which is about the mean adult respiratory rate

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Engagement, Psychological Fit, and Evolution in Movies on Our Minds

Malcolm Turvey

popular movies are so engaging,” why they “captivate” or “absorb” us, whence their “pull” or “power” (2021, ix–5). His answer is that “the lasting changes [he has] outlined serve, or are neutral to our engagement as viewers because of our biological

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Book Reviews

Katalin E. Bálint, William Brown, Sabine Schlickers, and Rebecca A. Sheehan

past one hundred years, ranging from micro (Chapters 3–5, low-level features) to mezzo (Chapters 6–9, shots and scenes) to macro units (Chapters 10–13, sequences). These chapters offer a detailed overview of how popular movies look and how their shape

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Replies to Commentators on Movies on Our Minds

James E. Cutting

shot is seldom used more than once), scenes are not like sentences (there is nothing visual in a scene analogous to nouns, verbs, adjectives, and the like), and popular movies have spoken language within them, which suggests an unfortunate regress (are

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Goldilocks Aesthetics

James E. Cutting

. doi: 10.1016/0304-422X(86)90003-3 . 10.1016/0304-422X(86)90003-3 Cutting , James E . 2019 . “ Simplicity, Complexity, and Narration in Popular Movies .” In Narrative Complexity: Cognition, Embodiment, Evolution , ed. Marina Grishakova and

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A True Language of Cinema

Maria Belodubrovskaya

independently produces narrative cuing is the reaction shot. Movies on Our Minds contains an entire chapter dedicated to it, and the chapter makes my point in its first sentence: “Reaction shots are popular movies’ most important narrational device” (2021

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Further Thoughts on Measuring Narrational Complexity in Fiction Film

Joseph P. Magliano, Lingfei Luan, and Laura Allen

language arts education that advocate the use of culturally relevant media (e.g., popular movies, commercials, songs) as scaffolds for teaching literary analysis ( Lee 2007 ). However, these cultural artifacts need to have sufficient complexity to support