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Bringing Slavery into the Light in Postcolonial Portugal

The rhetoric and poetics of a slavery exhibition

Paula Mota Santos

exhibition, as well as on the latter's postcolonial gaze ripe with imperial continuities ( Santos 2018b ). Relevant to the analysis presented here is the fact that in the 2010 exhibition the actual remains of some of the dead enslaved Africans were on

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Postcolonial Finance

The Political History of ‘Risk-Versus-Reward’ Investment in Emerging Markets

Cecilia Schultz

.2 trillion US dollars, far overshadowing the aid received by these countries ( Hickel 2017 ). This article aims to reveal the postcolonial nature of contemporary finance by examining the colonial history entangled in the discourse of emerging markets. Here

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Shakespeare’s Orientalism Revisited

A Postcolonial Study of the Appropriation of Arabic/Islamic Allusions and Matters in the Bard’s Oeuvre

Mahmoud F. Al-Shetawi

simply draws on the stereotypical images of these characters in Elizabethan culture. This article aims to look into Shakespeare's treatment of the Orient, especially the Arab world and Islam, in line with postcolonial literary discourse as postulated in

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Amy Kallander

East and North Africa and Europe, demonstrate that relations of coloniality between the former colony and the French metropole, or what Anibal Quijano describes as the racial and geo-cultural identities that they had produced, reached into the post-colonial

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Anna-Leena Toivanen

While postcolonial studies acknowledge the crucial role of mobility in the history of the colonial project and in the contemporary processes of globalization, the field has been more interested in analyzing the outcomes of mobility than in seeing

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Etty Terem

theoretical approaches, studying new sources, and revisiting old ones, historians, inspired by postcolonial theorists, have offered a considerable reevaluation of the history and historiography of the various colonies and France 1 . Despite growing interest in

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Asma Abbas

about which disasters are named and which go unnamed, where they become real crises of postcolonial neoliberalism and where they remain ad hoc disasters invoked, as need arises, for a presumptive new life for a dying order. That the many Acehs of our

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Fictionalising Post-colonial Theory

The Creative Native Informant?

Anastasia Valassopoulos

How can a novel be both a Harlequin romance (the equivalent of a British Mills and Boon book) and an example of post-colonial counter-discourse? In the same stroke, how can Spivak proclaim herself not learned enough to be interdisciplinary? Surely interdisciplinariness has become an integral part of post-colonial theory and investigation and to proclaim oneself not erudite enough is to put the practice of casual interdisciplinary action into question on ethical and scholarly grounds. And yet post-colonial studies thrives on its interdisciplinary methods and we are certainly not all philosophers, social scientists or professional politicians. In fact, it is possible to argue, as I intend to do here, that postcolonial literary works can also be interdisciplinary, thereby challenging us to reveal the inherent interdisciplinary nature of the field itself. In this case, breaking rules is not difficult and, yes, much can be learned from this action. So, as well as demonstrating a post-colonial textual analysis indebted to an interdisciplinary approach, as this special issue calls for, this article will further reveal how, often, writers themselves are already involved in utilising an interdisciplinary approach in their fiction. This can make it difficult to separate the authors’ intentions; are they writing in their capacity as authors, critics or both?

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Florian Helfer

students to deconstruct these myths. As key media of German history education, history textbooks play an important role in this. Simultaneously, the discussions about (post-)colonial history have had an impact on the representation of the colonial past in

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Poverty in Freedom versus Opulence in Chains

Satirical Exposé of the Postcolonial Dictatorships in Kourouma's Waiting for the Wild Beasts to Vote

Isaac Ndlovu

In my examination of Ahmadou Kourouma's satirical 'historiographic metafiction' (Hutcheon 1988: 93) Waiting for the Wild Beasts to Vote [1998] (2004), I argue that this narrative shows that in postcolonial Africa freedom from colonial rule has resulted neither in privilege nor power for the majority of African citizens. In the novel, Kourouma employs but also subverts the style of donsomana or praise poetry in his satirisation of postcolonial African ways of wielding political power. Largely narrated by Bingo, a satirical griot, the novel adopts a mock-epic mode as a way of acknowledging but also subverting both traditional African and European modernistic conceptualisations of the historical and literary. Among other things, the title of the novel satirises the inadequacy of electoral processes imposed by the Western nations to bring about smooth power transitions and genuine freedoms to the African populace. The novel's title also mocks African rulers for undermining democracy and those who are ruled for their inability to seize the voting opportunities, which in the novel are sometimes presented as moments of genuine civil power, to rid themselves of the emasculating dictators.