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Tim Ingold

preparation for history—or what came to be known as prehistory —was thus a direct precipitate of Enlightenment humanism. Yet many contemporary scholars proclaim the days of humanism to be over or at least numbered. We are entering, they say, a new era of post-humanity

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Humans “in the Loop”?

Human-Centrism, Posthumanism, and AI

Nandita Biswas Mellamphy

reconstituting human interests in ways that exceed the anthropocentric frame itself” ( Krause 2016: 6 ). Posthumanism, I argue, provides a strong theoretical basis reimagining alternative ethical constructs and frameworks. I adopt Maria Puig de la Bellacasa

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The Return of the Animal

Posthumanism, Indigeneity, and Anthropology

Danielle DiNovelli-Lang

The vectors by which the question of the animal has confronted the discipline of anthropology are both diverse—from paleoarchaeological fascination with the transition from ape to man to sociocultural accounts of human-animal conflict—and fraught insofar as they tend to loop back into one another. For instance, while posthumanism is intellectually novel, to take its line of critique seriously is to recognize that the science of man has depended on the philosophical animal from the start. A still tighter loop could be drawn around Lévi-Strauss's foundational interest in animal symbolism and the Amazonian ontologies undergirding Latour's amodern philosophy. Three related interdependencies pull hard on these loops: 1) philosophy and anthropology; 2) the human and the animal; 3) modernity and indigeneity. This last interdependency is notably undertheorized in the present efflorescence of human-animal scholarship. This article attends to some of the consequences of modernity/indigeneity's clandestine operations in the literature.

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Milja Kurki

might engage a more “post-human” 1 and “planetary order” (as opposed to continuing to advance an unchanged “liberal world order”). In this planetary context, we may come to see democracy and “the human” as embedded in complex ecological systems and

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“Text-as-Means” versus “Text-as-End-in-Itself”

Some Reasons Why Literary Scholars Have Been Slow to Hop on the Mobilities Bus

Lynne Pearce

offer for why literary scholarship—including the “text-as-means” model outlined above—sits somewhat uncomfortably alongside a good deal of post-NMP research is the latter's avowed posthumanist standpoint. While posthumanism also figures as an important

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Queer Sinofuturism

The Aberrant Movements and Posthumanist Mutations of Body, Identity, and Matter in Lu Yang's Uterus Man

Gabriel Remy-Handfield

surrealistic, grotesque, kitschy, humorous, and colorful—simultaneously shock and intrigue. The majority of the artist's films and installations explore a posthuman world where he “dramatizes the transformation of human bodies through their connection to non

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Animals, Plants, People, and Things

A Review of Multispecies Ethnography

Laura A. Ogden, Billy Hall, and Kimiko Tanita

This article defines multispecies ethnography and links this scholarship to broader currents within academia, including in the biosciences, philosophy, political ecology, and animal welfare activism. The article is organized around a set of productive tensions identified in the review of the literature. It ends with a discussion of the “ethnographic” in multispecies ethnography, urging ethnographers to bring a “speculative wonder” to their mode of inquiry and writing.

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Jeffrey B. Griswold

Abstract

This article complicates scholarship on Macbeth that understands political attachment in terms of an autonomous subject and attributes Macbeth's demise to an over-susceptibility to natural or supernatural forces. By putting early modern accounts of the humoral constitution of the night air in conversation with modern theories of apostrophe, I argue that the Macbeths’ experiences of night theorise political action as inseparable from the nonhuman forces in the play. Shakespeare reworks his source material to explore the borders of the human, imagining a more complex relationship between treasonous violence and the darkness that enshrouds Scotland.

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Non-normative Bodies, Queer Identities

Marginalizing Queer Girls in YA Dystopian Literature

Miranda A. Green-Barteet and Jill Coste

In this article we consider the absence of queer female protagonists in dystopian Young Adult (YA) fiction and examine how texts with queer protagonists rely on heteronormative frameworks. Often seen as progressive, dystopian YA fiction features rebellious teen girls resisting the restrictive norms of their societies, but it frequently sidelines queerness in favor of heteronormative romance for its predominantly white, able-bodied protagonists. We analyze The Scorpion Rules (2015) and Love in the Time of Global Warming (2013), both of which feature queer girl protagonists, and conclude that these texts ultimately marginalize that queerness. While they offer readers queer female protagonists, they also equate queerness with non-normative bodies and reaffirm heteronormativity. The rebellion of both protagonists effectively distances them from the queer agency they have developed throughout the narratives.

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Introduction

Posthuman? Nature and Culture in Renegotiation

Kornelia Engert and Christiane Schürkmann

human” ( Strum 2001 ), “beyond humanity” ( Ingold 2013 ), networks of “other-than-human critters” ( Haraway 2016: 18 ), or “more-than-human” geographies ( Greenhough 2014 ), a virulent debate accrues to or culminates in querying “the Posthuman