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Heidi Hakkarainen

worked with Karl Marx in Paris. 5 In line with this, mass publications like newspapers also came to attribute new meanings to the concept of humanism in the run up to the 1848/49 revolutions. By focusing on the press, whose role has been understudied in

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Alain Vaillant

Pour un panorama de l’action législative et administrative en matière de censure, le plus commode est encore de se reporter à : Jacques Godechot, Les Institutions de la France sous la Révolution et l’Empire (Paris : Presses universitaires de France

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Journalistes scandaleuses des années trente

Petite réflexion sur l’histoire de la presse de l’entre-deux-guerres

Marie-Ève Thérenty

place dans la presse généraliste (les presses féminine et féministes seront toujours des espaces possibles mais ce sont aussi des ghettos). Elles seront peu à y parvenir. Elles se comptent sur les doigts d’une main sous la Monarchie de juillet, elles

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“It Is Better to Die”

Abbé Rousseau and the Meanings of Suicide

Jeffrey Merrick

eighteenth century the debate about suicide moved from the courts to the press. As Michael MacDonald and Terence Murphy Historical Reflections • Summer 2016 have shown, the same shift took place in England sooner than in France, thanks to relative liberty of

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Xandra Miguel-Lorenzo

. ( 1995 ), ‘ Women are more “Indian”: Ethnicity and gender in a community near Cuzco ’, in B. Larson and O. Harris (eds), Ethnicity, Markets, and Migration in the Andes ( Durham, NC : Duke University Press ), 329 – 348 . 10

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Patricia Mainardi

While periodicals with illustrations had existed prior to the 1830s, the letter-press used for text until the advent of photographic technology could not be combined with the etching, engraving, or lithography that produced images. Pictures had to

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Gideon Kouts

Hebrew culture, including the press and theatre criticism, has always maintained a tangled and delicate relationship with Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice , for understandable reasons. This article investigates the first criticism of this

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Serpil Atamaz-Hazar

This article discusses the historical value of Ottoman women’s periodicals published in the aftermath of the 1908 Revolution, which marked the beginning of the Constitutional Era (1908–1918). Through specific examples of women’s writings in the press, it illustrates how these periodicals can shed light on the previously unexplored aspects of this period. The article argues that women’s journals allow scholars both to recover the identities and stories of hundreds of women, which would have been lost otherwise, and to challenge the mainstream historiography, which has traditionally presented a one-dimensional portrayal of the Constitutional Era by privileging men’s voices and experiences over women’s. It demonstrates that women’s journals not only reveal a dynamic, flexible, and complex milieu, in which women could and did act as agents of both social and political change, but also signify the multifaceted transformation the Revolution of 1908 caused in Ottoman society in the early twentieth century.

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An Indochinese Dominion

L'Effort indochinois and Autonomy in a Global Context, 1936–1939

M. Kathryn Edwards

prisoners, introduced new labor rights, relaxed press censorship, and increased their tolerance of public meetings and demonstrations. Minister of Colonies Marius Moutet replaced Indochina Governor General René Robin with the ostensibly more liberal Jules

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The Emergence of the Ladino Press

The First Attempt at Westernization of Ottoman Jews (1842–1846)

Olga Borovaya

This article discusses the emergence of the first Ladino periodical in the Ottoman Empire, Sha'arei Mizrach (Gates of the Orient), which came out in Izmir in 1845-1846. Based on the analysis of this newspaper and the contemporaneous European Jewish press, the essay clarifies the common misconception about the name and the background of the periodical's editor, and claims that it was published by a Jew of Italian extraction and a resident of Izmir in association with two Italian Jews from Trieste connected with Moses Montefiore. Sha'arei Mizrach lasted only a few months because it failed to receive enough subscriptions.