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Haifaa Majadly and Aharon Geva-Kleinberger

five and six of primary school) that pupils are presented with grammatical topics for the first time in the curricula of all of the sample countries. In these years, grammar is taught from separate textbooks, in contrast to the lower years, in which it

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Kira Mahamud Angulo and Yovana Hernández Laina

world over. 8 Bearing these premises in mind, we set ourselves three objectives: to examine discourse on economic matters in official political documents related to education; to analyze the transmission of economic culture(s) in primary school textbooks

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Suzan Hirsch

This paper reports on case studies spanning four consecutive years (2005-2008) focused on addressing and challenging Australian primary school boys’ disengagement with English, particularly reading, using an action research process informed by both quantitative and qualitative data. Primary participants were all male and ranged from 8 to 11 years of age. Boys were identified and selected for each case study based on the questionnaire and interview results from whole grade surveys of both males and females. The data results identified the boys with negative views of literacy and boys who identified reading as being a feminine activity, thereby narrowing their perceptions of masculinity. These boys were involved in a reading/mentoring program with high profile professional Rugby League players. The celebrity rugby league players were involved in ten weekly mentoring and reading sessions with male participants each year. These sessions focused on building positive male identity, shifting negative attitudes to reading and challenging negative stereotypes of both professional sportsmen and boys as readers. After each of the case studies, quantitative and qualitative data indicated a positive change in the participants’ attitudes towards reading as well as their perceived stereotypes of males as readers and increased involvement in voluntary reading.

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Gwynneth Lewis

Over the last 130 years attendance by Jewish children at Jewish day schools in Britain has waxed and waned, until now, in the twenty-first century, attendance figures are similar to those of the 1880s, with almost 60 per cent of Jewish children attending a Jewish primary or secondary school. Recent research has examined this trend within the Jewish population as a whole, mainly concentrating on Jewish secondary schooling. Because of the impact this phenomenon has had on chederim and because of the fundamental differences between the different branches of Judaism, it is important for Jewish educators and leaders to understand what factors lie behind the choices that parents make when deciding on their children's schooling. This study investigates the reasons why parents who are affiliated to Progressive synagogues choose to send their children to Orthodox Jewish primary schools, concentrating on one Progressive community in the north of England in particular, and contrasting the data with that from two larger and older communities. The data was collected through the use of interviews and questionnaires, then analysed in relation to the history and size of the three communities and contrasted with the conclusions of previous studies. The findings suggest that the size and relative age and history of the principal community have had a significant influence on the attitudes of the parents toward the city's Jewish community and the importance of the role of the Orthodox Jewish primary school in maintaining that community, to the extent that the parents' social identity as 'Jews' is more important to them than their synagogue affiliation.

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Individualization and Ethnopedagogy at Small Elementary Schools

Components of Vocational Training for University Tutors

Nikolai Neustroev, Anna Neustroeva, Tuyaara Shergina, and Jenanne K. Ferguson

years, primary schools have had some experience this implementing the new standard, and the pedagogical community of primary school teachers has also had the opportunity to understand the new paradigm of education and upbringing aimed at obtaining an

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Teaching National Identity and Alterity

Nineteenth Century American Primary School Geography Textbooks

Bahar Gürsel

demonstrate the widely internalized images of the American land and nation (and of other, “foreign” peoples) propagated by mainstream US primary school geography textbooks in the nineteenth century. Mitchell’s First Lessons in Geography was originally issued

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Julie Spray

antibiotics. At-risk children who experience a sore throat are offered free swabbing through primary care clinics and some schools to test for the streptococcus A bacteria that signals a strep throat infection. 1 At Tūrama School, the primary school where I

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Yitzhak-Rabin-Schule

The Re-establishment of a Jewish School in Düsseldorf

Jonathan Grünfeld

The Yitzhak-Rabin-Schule is the Jewish primary school in Düsseldorf. Opened in 1993, it is considered by its sponsor, the Jewish Congregation Düsseldorf, as a successor of the 'Private Jüdische Volksschule' which was forced to close by law in 1942. The primary school started with seventeen pupils in a transitional space and was finally able to move into its own building ten years after its establishment. Currently 150 pupils visit the only Jewish school in Düsseldorf.

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Keith Crawford

This article offers a critical exploration of social studies textbooks and allied curriculum materials used in New South Wales primary schools between 1930 and 1960, and of the way in which these texts positioned, discussed, and assessed Aboriginal Australians. With reference to European commitments to Enlightenment philosophies and social Darwinian views of race and culture, the author argues that Aboriginal peoples were essentialized via a discourse of paternalism and cultural and biological inferiority. Thus othered in narratives of Australian identity and national progress, Aboriginal Australians were ascribed a role as marginalized spectators or as a primitive and disappearing anachronism.

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Joanna Wojdon

This article analyzes textbooks and curricula for primary schools in Poland published between 1944 and 1989 to show how the communist regime attempted to influence Polish history education via political change and educational reform. The article focuses on five aspects of this influence: Marxist methodology of history, portrayals of political parties, promotion of a “scientific“ worldview, justification of new boundaries and alliances of the People's Poland, and a new pantheon of national heroes. In conclusion, the article investigates the effectiveness of history education in shaping Polish collective memory under the communist regime.