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Protest Wave or Protest Spike?

An Examination of European Protest Activity, 2008–2012

Matthew Schoene

Many scholars have cited the social unrest stemming from the European sovereign debt crisis as a prime example of a protest wave ( della Porta and Mattoni 2014 ; Flesher Fominaya 2015 ; Gerbaudo 2013 ). Protest is an accepted form of political

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Alena Minchenia

analyze the Belarusian opposition in connection to elections (Ash 2015; Bedford 2017 ; Nikolayenko 2015 , 2017 ; Silitski 2012 , 2015 ) and consequently deal with the electoral protests (e.g., Korosteleva 2009 ; Navumau 2016 ). As elections are

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Introduction

Performance, Power, Exclusion, and Expansion in Anthropological Accounts of Protests

Aet Annist

From Max Gluckmann's (1954) work on rituals of rebellion to more recent work on such protest movements as Occupy ( Graeber 2009 ) or the Arab Spring ( Bayat 2015 ), anthropology has sought to analyze dissent as a process of collision with

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Asymmetries of Spatial Contestations

Controlling Protest Spaces and Coalition-Building during the Iranian December 2017 Protests

Tareq Sydiq

“the nature and possibility of social protest” ( 2001: 61 ) and Joel Stillerman's (2003) assertion that geography influences political opportunities, alliances, and repertoires. The role of the state in processes of alliance formation is similarly

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Jillian Schwedler

In 2003, I was sitting with some activists at a café in Amman, Jordan, discussing recent changes to the Public Gathering Law. Organizers of protest events were required to obtain a permit to hold any kind of demonstration or march, a restriction

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Pollyanna Ruiz

In The Practice of Everyday Life, de Certeau likens himself to a Solar Eye reading the city spread out like a text below. He compares this all-seeing position to the enmeshed position of those whose intermingled footsteps pass through the city streets, writing stories that deliberately elude legibility. These two ways of experiencing the city offer a theoretical frame through which I will explore both the administration of protest spaces, and protesters’ ongoing attempts to subvert and evade those controls. In doing so, this contribution will examine the way in which the police practice of kettling depends upon the police’s ability to draw a series of distinctions between ‘good’ protesters who comply with state demands, and ‘bad’ protesters who err from official routes. It will go onto to explore the way in which the practice of maptivism impacts upon protesters’ ability to occupy city spaces and resist the totalizing administrations of the state.

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Flying above Bloodshed

Performative Protest in the Scared City of Damascus

Ziad Adwan

and left things uncertain. Many Damascenes found it easier to deny the demonstrations, pretending that nothing was happening in the country, so they could spend their days “normally” as the Syrian media described the situation during the protests. We

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“Where Is the New Constitution?”

Public Protest and Community-Building in Post–Economic Collapse Iceland

Timothy Heffernan

This article explores how protest continues to offer opportunities for Icelanders to engage in contentious politics against a “corrupt” political establishment, while at the same time providing a space to envision a future free of ongoing

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Shutting Down Protest

Policing, International Summitry, and the G20 Experiment in Brisbane

Binoy Kampmark

protesters is being increasingly insulated and marginalized from such gatherings. In Brisbane 2014, the G20 summit witnessed one of the more successful efforts at limiting and in most cases shutting down public protest in its entirety. The narrative of

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Conjuring “the people”

The 2013 Babylution protests and desire for political transformation in postwar Bosnia-Herzegovina

Larisa Kurtović

In June 2013, after years of mounting political discontent and periodic expectation of a large-scale civic 1 insurrection, the sleepy streets of Bosnian-Herzegovinian cities and towns suddenly filled with protesters. This wave of demonstrations