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Andreas Baranowski and Heiko Hecht

film before he went on to discuss depth and motion, attention, memory and imagination, and emotions—topics that befit any cognitive psychology book today. Münsterberg presented these chapters in an ordered fashion corresponding to his concept of

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Carl Plantinga

Film scholars, critics, filmmakers, and audiences all routinely employ intuitive, untutored "folk psychology" in viewing, interpreting, critiquing, and making films. Yet this folk psychology receives little attention in film scholarship. This article argues that film scholars ought to pay far more attention to the nature and uses of folk psychology. Turning to critical work on Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho, the article demonstrates the diverse and sometimes surprising ways that folk psychology is used in criticism. From an evolutionary perspective, the article defends the critic's and audience's interests in characters as persons. It also defends folk psychology against some of its most vocal detractors, and provides some guidance into how cognitive film theorists might employ folk psychology, arguing that such employment must supplement and correct folk psychology with scientific psychology and philosophical analysis. Finally, the article argues that the application of folk psychology to films is a talent, a skill, and a sensitivity rather than a science.

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Life or Profit?

Structural Violence, Moral Psychology and Pharmaceutical Politics

Donna Goldstein

This article explores the antagonism expressed by two different theoretical positions within medical anthropology towards the structural violence position: the culture as central approach and the post-structuralist approach. While medical anthropologists trained in cultural models of illness are disappointed by the lack of culture in the structural violence approach, medical anthropologists trained in post-structuralist models of illness take issue with what they perceive to be its moral and universalist claims. In order to explore these universalist claims, the author returns to the field of moral psychology and its understanding of universal morality by exploring the history of the Heinz dilemma. She then frames her own recent research on global pharmaceutical politics in Argentina and Mexico in the context of the Heinz dilemma, neo-liberal discourses of capitalism, and the theoretical positions available within medical anthropology.

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Ed Tan

Skip Dine Young, Psychology at the Movies

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From Morality to Psychology

Emotion Concepts in Urdu, 1870—1920

Margrit Pernau

journals, if not actually the most popular, in Urdu and contributed largely to the creation of the community as a political unit and to its mobilization. The last section presents the first texts in Urdu on psychology, notably the psychology of emotions and

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Fusion and Reform

The Potential for Identity Fusion to Reduce Recidivism and Improve Reintegration

Harvey Whitehouse and Robin Fitzgerald

our approach seeks to build on desistance theory, our focus on the role of group psychology is distinctive. Desistance theorists have tended to emphasise personal identities and psychological motivations, such as hope and belief in self-efficacy (e

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Introduction

Concepts of Emotions in Indian Languages

Margrit Pernau

way emotions and moral categories are delineated or conflated. This introduction will proceed in two steps. The first section will discuss the challenge a conceptual history of emotions faces from psychology’s perception of affective phenomena as

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The Eisenstein-Vygotsky-Luria Collaboration

Triangulation and Third Culture Debates

Julia Vassilieva

-historical psychology and neuroscience shaped Eisenstein's film theory and practice. To do so, I focus on three specific areas: language and speech; motor regulation and expressive movement; and synesthesia. Through my analysis, I demonstrate how we can see at work in

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Joanna Bourke

evolutionary psychology approach; ignoring new forms of aggression; and failing to acknowledge the political underpinnings of his own research. In this article, I will explore these shortcomings in relation to sexual violence. The study of sexual violence is

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Natalie Mera Ford

Interdisciplinary scholars, stressing the lack of firm disciplinary boundaries for British science in much of the nineteenth century, have pointed to evidence of mutual influence between the discourses of 'mental science', or psychology, and imaginative literature. This article treats Chapters on Mental Physiology (1852) by the English physician Henry Holland as a case study of heightened concern over the competing cultural authority implied by such mutual influence, and specifically over the inclusion of references to dramatic and lyrical works in early Victorian mental theory. It examines the medical author's self-conscious attempts to separate the developing profession of psychology from a tradition in philosophical discourse of enlisting imaginative writing for illustration and support. It further explores the way Holland strives to marginalise his text's occasional, paradoxical slips back into citing poetry by relegating this material to subordinate paratexts. How to safely deploy literature in service of science thus emerges as a key epistemological and rhetorical issue that Henry Holland, representing the consolidating field of British psychology at large, grapples with in his mid-century study of the mind.