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Annette Mehlhorn

What is a vocation? Already as a young girl, I did not consider my faith to be something private. Faith was my way of seeing the world; it was also what showed me my responsibility in and for the world. Ever since I was about sixteen years old, it became ever clearer to me that this faith should also become my profession. With that, I made a decision in favour of a public mission where religious matters were concerned.

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David Meyer

‘Ein Tzaddik Ela Memaheh’, ‘no-one can pretend to be a Tzaddik – righteous – unless one is ready and willing to intervene in the affairs of the world’. I open with this particular Talmudic phrase because I believe that in many respects this teaching is key to the role of religion in society.

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From Morality to Psychology

Emotion Concepts in Urdu, 1870—1920

Margrit Pernau

indicator and at the same time as a factor of a profound emotionalization of private as well as public life. The period under consideration was not only the high noon of imperialism in India, but also saw the beginnings of Indian nationalism before Gandhi

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Anticorruption

A Case of “Good, but Could Do Better”

Dan Hough

German firms have a similarly downbeat view on the role that corruption plays in public life in Germany with a 2014 survey from Ernst and Young revealing that 26 percent feel that corruption is pervasive. If that figure is not worrying enough, it is

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Bicycle Politics

Review Essay

Jennifer Bonham

J. Harry Wray, Pedal Power: The Quiet Rise of the Bicycle in American Public Life (Boulder: Paradigm Publishers, 2008)

Jeff Mapes, Pedaling Revolution: How Cyclists are Changing American Cities (Corvallis: Oregon State University Press, 2009)

Zack Furness, One Less Car: Bicycling and the Politics of Automobility (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2010)

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Elisa Camiscioli

In her 1938 essay Three Guineas, Virginia Woolf questioned the meaning of patriotism and national belonging for British women who, because of their gender, were denied equal access to education, property, the professions, and the political world. As the growing possibility of war amplified the calls for national unity, Woolf suggested that such patriotic sentiment was illogical for women, as they played no role in the public life of the nation.

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Jaap Bos, Keebet von Benda-Beckmann, Ad Borsboom, Andrew Richards and Stephen Nugent

Anthony Elliott, Social theory since Freud: Traversing social imaginaries

James M. Donovan and H. Edwin Anderson, Anthropology and law by Keebet von Benda-Beckmann

Silvie Poirier, A world of relationships: Itineraries, dreams, and events in the Australian Western desert

Robert M. Fishman, Democracy’s voices: Social ties and the quality of public life in Spain

George Mentore, Of passionate curves and desirable cadences: Themes on Waiwai social being Suzanne Oakdale, I foresee my life: The ritual performance of autobiography in an Amazonian community

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The French Carbon Tax

Autopsy of an Ambition

Éloi Laurent

The French carbon tax was to become in 2010 the centerpiece of the country's new climate change mitigation strategy. After a heated public debate, the Constitutional Council, France's higher constitutional law body, censored the executive's proposal, which in turn, in the aftermath of a severe electoral defeat, announced the indefinite postponement of the carbon tax. This article tries to make sense of this important sequence in French contemporary public life by reviewing its different facets: environmental economics, political economy, constitutional law, and finally politics.

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Andrei S. Markovits and Joseph Klaver

The Greens' impact on German politics and public life has been enormous and massively disproportional to the size of their electoral support and political presence in the country's legislative and executive bodies on the federal, state, and local levels. After substantiating the Greens' proliferating presence on all levels of German politics with numbers; the article focuses on demonstrating how the Greens' key values of ecology, peace and pacifism, feminism and women's rights, and grass roots democracy—the signifiers of their very identity—have come to shape the existence of all other German parties bar none. If imitation is one of the most defining characteristics of success, the Greens can be immensely proud of their tally over the past thirty plus years.

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“I Earn, Therefore I Exist”

Impoverished Bedouin Mothers Who Become Entrepreneurs

Nuzha Allassad Alhuzail

The changes among Bedouin in the Negev since the establishment of the State of Israel have had far-reaching implications for Bedouin women and their families. Bedouin women are marginalized, excluded from public life and the labor market. This exacerbates the economic inequality between Arabs and Jews, institutionalized, inter alia, in the 'Arab enclave', which lacks industrialization and is allocated fewer resources. This is a qualitative study among 20 Bedouin women raising large families and living in poverty who participated in SAWA, a microfinance program established by the Koret Foundation in Israel. It examines the process undergone by these women who succeeded in creating employment for themselves and for family members, thus raising their status within the family. Their contribution to the family income also improved their relationship with their husbands and other members of their family.