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Not Just a Phase

Queer Girlhood and Coming of Age on Screen

Whitney Monaghan

In this article, I seek to interrogate the visibility of queer girls in contemporary cinema. I demonstrate how queerness has long been associated with a passing phase of adolescent development in the teen media sphere. I reflect on the nuanced relationships between queerness and girlhood in four contemporary US independent queer films, arguing that Pariah (2011), Mosquita y Mari (2012), First Girl I Loved (2016), and Princess Cyd (2017) are representative of a new wave of queer girlhood on screen. Rejecting the pervasive tropes of coming out as coming of age and just a phase, these films use queer girlhood to challenge linear models of girlhood.

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Amanda H. Littauer

Drawing on letters and writings by teenage girls and oral history interviews, this article aims to open a scholarly conversation about the existence and significance of intergenerational sexual relationships between minor girls and adult women in the years leading up to and encompassing the lesbian feminist movement of the 1970s. Lesbian history and culture say very little about sexual connections between youth and adults, sweeping them under the rug in gender-inflected ways that differ from the suppression of speech in gay male history and culture about intergenerational sex between boys and men. Nonetheless, my research suggests that, despite lesbian feminists’ caution and even negativity toward teen girls, erotic and sexual relationships with adult women provided girls access to support, pleasure, mentorship, and community.

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Laurel Hart, Pamela Lamb and Joshua Cader

others. While I faced marginalization and discrimination as a young queer woman, I was also privileged as a white, middle-class college student. Discourse communities, such as those created by queer girls and young women on social media, are leading

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Editorial

Dislodging Girlhood?

Claudia Mitchell

I am very grateful to Barbara Brickman, the guest editor of this Special Issue of Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal for her term “dislodging girlhood” in the context of heteronormativity. Repeatedly in this issue Marnina Gonick’s pivotal question, “Are queer girls, girls?” (2006: 122) is cited. In the 13 years since she posed this question, we have not seen enough attempts made to address it. To mix my metaphors I see this issue of Girlhood Studies as helping to break the silence and simultaneously to open the floodgates to a ground-breaking collection of responses to Gonick’s question. Given the rise of the right in the US and in so many other countries, queer girls— trans, lesbian, gender non-conforming, non-binary to mention just a few possibilities—are at even greater risk than before. Girlhood Studies has always been concerned with social justice, so this special issue is a particularly important one in our history. It is also worth noting that many of the articles are written or co-authored by new scholars, signaling an encouraging trend in academic work that has social justice at its core. I thank Barbara Brickman, the authors, and the reviewers for their history-making contributions to the radical act of dislodging girlhood.

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Non-normative Bodies, Queer Identities

Marginalizing Queer Girls in YA Dystopian Literature

Miranda A. Green-Barteet and Jill Coste

In this article we consider the absence of queer female protagonists in dystopian Young Adult (YA) fiction and examine how texts with queer protagonists rely on heteronormative frameworks. Often seen as progressive, dystopian YA fiction features rebellious teen girls resisting the restrictive norms of their societies, but it frequently sidelines queerness in favor of heteronormative romance for its predominantly white, able-bodied protagonists. We analyze The Scorpion Rules (2015) and Love in the Time of Global Warming (2013), both of which feature queer girl protagonists, and conclude that these texts ultimately marginalize that queerness. While they offer readers queer female protagonists, they also equate queerness with non-normative bodies and reaffirm heteronormativity. The rebellion of both protagonists effectively distances them from the queer agency they have developed throughout the narratives.

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Editorial

Girlhood Studies at 10

Claudia Mitchell

contemporary women.” Michelle Miller, in her article, “Theorizing “The Plunge”: [Queer] Girls’ Adolescence, Risk, and Subjectivity in Blue is the Warmest Color ,” proposes that if we are “to honor girls’ sexual subjectivity, we must treat romantic risk

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Contemporary Girls Studies

Reflections on the Inaugural International Girls Studies Association Conference

Victoria Cann, Sarah Godfrey and Helen Warner

pursue inclusivity actively as a political and ethical practice; there was a predominance of work that focused on heteronormative frames of girlhood. A pressing issue here has to do with the limited presence or, rather, absence, of trans and queer girls

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Theorizing “The Plunge”

(Queer) Girls’ Adolescence, Risk, and Subjectivity in Blue is the Warmest Color

Michelle Miller

for girls’ sexual safety ( Kendall 2013 ), in which some girls—queer girls, working class girls and girls of colour—are more at risk than others ( Fields 2008 ; Fine 1988 ; Gilbert 2007 ; Kendall 2013 ). Fields and Tolman reference Gayle Rubin

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Tweens as Technofeminists

Exploring Girlhood Identity in Technology Camp

Jen England and Robert Cannella

.” Washington Post , 14 October . http://wapo.st/1r4KCMY?tid=ss_tw (accessed 12 April 2017 ). Driver , Susan . 2007 . Queer Girls and Popular Culture: Reading, Resisting, and Creating Media . New York : Peter Lang . Girls Make Games . “Overview

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Guiding Girls

Neoliberal Governance and Government Educational Resource Manuals in Canada

Lisa Smith and Stephanie Paterson

Neoliberal Girl Subject .” NWSA Journal 18 ( 2 ): 43 – 54 . Gonick , Marnina . 2006b . “ Sugar and Spice and Something More than Nice? Queer Girls and Transformations of Social Exclusion .” In Girlhood: Redefining the Limits , ed. Yasmin Jiwani