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Michelle Bumatay

This article explores the strategies Gabonese cartoonist Pahé deploys to disrupt media-driven images of Africa in both his autobiographical series La vie de Pahé ['The Life of Pahé'] and the fictional series Dipoula, co-created with French cartoonist Sti. It focuses on the role of humor as a way to mock Western hegemony while exposing how sustained colonial logic informs Western representations of Africa. Using humor that thrives on misrecognition, Pahé thwarts readers' expectations and facilitates new possibilities for thinking through the relationship between Europe and Africa, while also drawing attention to the attendant relationship between Franco-Belgian bandes dessinées and other Francophone comics.

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“We Must Talk about Cologne”

Race, Gender, and Reconfigurations of “Europe”

Beverly Weber

Europeanness, suggesting that religious fanaticism, “genderization,” and sexualization are somehow inherently linked. A Regime of Gender Violence Elsewhere I have suggested that racializing discourses of Islam work within a regime of gender violence, a

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'red-headed animal'

Race, Sexuality and Dickens's Uriah Heep

Tara MacDonald

Criticism on Dickens and Jewish characterisations most often focuses on the way that Fagin, in Dickens's Oliver Twist (1837), draws from a long history of anti-Semitic representations. No critics have offered sustained arguments that connect Uriah Heep with anti-Semitic stereotypes. By doing so, I hope to broaden our understanding of the ways that Dickens's novels interact with nineteenth-century racial discourses, as well as the ways that these racial discourses interact with economic and sexual anxieties. My reading does not simply place Uriah within historical racial discourses, but examines the impact of his characterisation within the narrative itself, with specific emphasis on David's narrative voice. Although David calls attention to Uriah's unruly body in order to mark it as different, this very difference becomes, in the process, captivating to him. David is attracted to Uriah's oozing, uncontained body, which dramatically diverges from the English masculine ideal. Uriah's body is also presented as sexually threatening, a sentiment that is most fully realised in the danger he presents to Agnes's virginity. Jews, and indeed other 'foreign' bodies, were frequently associated with deviant sexualities in Victorian England, and in David Copperfield, Uriah exemplifies the way that foreign bodies were marked as sexually aberrant.

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Joel S. Kahn

In these remarks on race in Malaysia, I wish to engage the popularly held belief that racism in Malaysia is a legacy of colonialism. I will instead address the way racializing beliefs and practices in the Malaysian context are better understood in the context of processes of modern state- and nation-building during the period of so-called organized modernity, processes that were at work in both colonial and non-colonial settings. This explanation at the same time provides for a more effective resolution of what might otherwise appear to be a genuine paradox, namely, the fact that racism and anti-racism appear always to co-exist in the Malaysian context. I will deal with this sense of paradox historically by problematizing the most widely accepted explanation for the racialization of contemporary Malaysian society—that it is the legacy of Malaysia’s colonial past. Subjecting the argument for colonial exceptionalism to critical scrutiny clears the way for better explanations of the apparent persistence of racializing discourses and practices in post-colonial conditions, at the same time casting doubt on the effectiveness of the kinds of universalizing anti-racist practices and movements that characterize our times.

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Gamed by the System

Exploring Black Male Youths’ Motivation to Participate in Sports

Deborwah Faulk, Robert A. Bennett III, and James L. Moore III

between race and racial discourse and dominant ideologies and structures in society ( Hylton 2005 ). The institution of sports, similar to other social institutions, is influenced by key social actors that maintain the status quo. Moreover, because the

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The Mystery of the Missing Men

How Do Young Men Experience “Belong-ing” in Higher Education?

Vicki Trowler, Robert Allan, and Rukhsana Din

respondent from their study on the impact of racializing discourses on self-esteem, belonging, and academic performance as “occupying a space that wasn't meant for me.” By this, the respondent meant he had (as a black student) secured admission to the

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Jane Mummery and Debbie Rodan

nationalist and racialized discourse. Jacqueline Dalziell and Dinesh Joseph Wadiwel's (2016: 81) reading, for example, is that such framing continues an “orientalized discourse” that labels destination countries as “barbaric” and “non-civilized” while

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Leisuring Masculinities in British Indian Childhoods

Explorations at the Intersection of Gender Order and Generational Order

Utsa Mukherjee

-year-old children in an English primary school drew on racial discourses to present South Asian boys as “effeminate, quiet and non-physical”—which led to the latter's exclusion from football and “fighting games” in the school playground. This further

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When Cosmopolitans Get Ahead

W. T. Eady's I.D.B. or The Adventures of Solomon Davis (1887)

Danielle Kinsey

skepticism about their ability to assimilate as well as more racialized discourse in the definition of Jewishness, the connection between Jewishness and capitalism brought a heightened paranoia about who was assimilating to whom amid the Long Depression. 42

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Borders and Interruptions

Museums in the Age of Global Mobility, Mexico City, 7–9 June 2017

Gwyneira Isaac, Diana E. Marsh, Laura Osorio Sunnucks, and Anthony Shelton

support cultural diversity and Indigenous autonomy, the economic and cultural support for these material culture styles continues, contributing to this stunted racial discourse. State associated atrocities, such as those at Ayotzinapa in 2014, evidence the