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J.L. Black

In the debates surrounding the construction of the Trans-Siberian Railway, the transcontinental Canadian Pacific Railway was used as a model. This article traces how eyewitness accounts of Canadian settlement patterns were used by Russian entrepreneurs to argue the case for the financing and organisation of the Trans-Siberian Railway. Given the tense international political climate at the end of the 19th century, the Trans-Siberian also became a focus for imperial rivalry. This article gives a good overview of comparative colonial enterprise in two great continental colonies.

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Railway Territorialities

Topology and Infrastructural Politics in Alpine Italy

Mateusz Laszczkowski

another international railway through Valsusa that would double the existing connection. Officially known as the New Lyon-Turin Line ( Nuova Linea Torino-Lione , NLTL), the project is commonly yet incorrectly referred to as “the TAV.” 1 Originally

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Connected or Traversed?

Plans, Imaginaries, and the Actual State of Railway Projects in Mongolia

Maria-Katharina Lang and Baatarnaran Tsetsentsolmon

railways and roadways, media and information exchanges, and tourism. 2 These major projects intend to facilitate and encourage trade between Asia and Europe and to change global economies in general via “joint development and operation of third

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Traveling with Trained Man

Decolonizing Directions in Railway Mobilities

Katie Maher

In this article I approach the railways as a key site to study the possibilities of mobilities work as a decolonizing project. I take the image and idea of Trained Man, by Adelaide-based artist Darren Siwes who is of Ngalkban 1 and Dutch

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The Cadences of Rails

Unscheduled Stops in Tōkyō's Spaces of Flow

Robert J. Simpkins

This article investigates how the daily rhythms of the Japanese railway system in Tōkyō create elastic forms of urban space around its train stations, attracting a non-commuting public in search of useable space and social encounters. My focus

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Stalin's railway to nowhere

'The Dead Road' (1947-1953)

Victor L. Mote

The uncompleted railway across Northern Siberia was one of the most shameful projects of the post-war era, involving many deaths and huge discomforts. Hailed by Stalin himself as a major part of his 'Great Plan for the Transformation of Nature', the scheme was dropped at his death in 1953. By that time, less than 600 kilometres were in working operation, even though up to 300,000 persons had been involved and about a third of them had perished, while more than 40 billion rubles of capital investment had been wasted. Ghostly labour camps, rusting rolling stock and rails, hundreds of bridges remain in what has been called 'an open air museum of human technology', preserved by nature's refrigerator - the tundra. The article describes the reasons for the railway project and the 'Great Plan', the organization involved, and the conditions in which the enslaved workforce struggled for survival and died.

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Ritika Prasad

Focusing on the wide-ranging scholarship on how railway technology, travel, and infrastructure has affected South Asia‚ this article highlights recent interventions and shifts. It discusses how questions about land‚ labor‚ capital‚ and markets are being increasingly integrated with questions about how railways affected society‚ culture‚ and politics. It also stresses the increasing interest in comparative work‚ both in terms of locating railways within wider structures of transport and mobility as well as analyzing how South Asia’s engagement relates to the global impact of this technology.

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(Dis)Connected Rail

Infrastructural Suspension and Phatic Politics in Romania

Adrian Deoancă

Transylvania. As a conduit of sovereign power, “railways … were instrumental in legitimizing political authority. In the process, the specific distorted representation and its potential political usage mattered considerably more than the economic and social

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Dhan Zunino Singh

Considering ‘urban mobility as an important everyday life practice that produces meaning and culture,’ the present review discusses underground railway history in cultural terms. Following Colin Divall and George Revill, culture is understood here as representations and practices, and the underground railway ‘as mediation between the imaginable and the material.’ This review does not cover the prolific literature about this topic, but gathers perspectives from within and beyond transport or mobility history to contribute to a historical and comparative assessment of spatial representations and practices related to the production and uses of this subterranean mode of transport. The sources of these perspectives are Benson Bobrick’s Labyrinths of Iron, Rosalind Williams’s Notes on the Underground, Michael Brooks’s Subway City, David Pike’s Subterranean Cities, and Andrew Jenks’s A Metro of the Mount.

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State of Uncertainty

Educating the First Railroaders in Central Sakha (Yakutiya)

Sigrid Irene Wentzel

responded. Amused, yet skeptical, Anya replied, “I am afraid you won't find anything to study here, the railroad is not really working. Everybody prepared for the opening, the young got educated and now … nothing.” 1 While the existence of railway