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Daniela R. P. Weiner

At the end of the Second World War, education was seen by the Allies as a powerful tool in the remaking of postwar Europe. The Allies believed that the denazification, reorientation, and reeducation of Italian and German children through schools and

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A Camp for Foreigners and “Aliens”

The Harkis' Exile at the Rivesaltes Camp (1962–1964)

Jeannette E. Miller

The French government placed 20,000 of the approximately 100,000 harkis repatriated to France following the Algerian War in the Rivesaltes camp. Located in rural French Catalonia, it had previously lodged foreigners and French citizens whom the government removed from society. The decision to house the harkis in this camp, made during summer 1962 as the French government extricated itself from its 132-year empire in Algeria, symbolized that they were aliens: Berber and Arab repatriates, nearly all of whom obtained French nationality shortly after they arrived in France, were targeted by government housing policies that distanced them from public view. The camp's architecture, living conditions, isolation from French citizens, military oversight, and “reeducation” classes, beyond functioning as powerful symbols, reinforced—and contributed to—the government's treatment of the harkis as aliens. Over the twenty-seven months it remained open, Rivesaltes fostered an exilic existence for these harkis and socially excluded them from French society.

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Lesley Gill

Debates about the relationship of anthropology to the U.S. national security establishment are not new, and anthropologists are now forced to confront the issue again. Since the 11 September attacks, the U.S. military has stepped up efforts to recruit anthropologists to fight the so-called "war on terror," and a group of self-identified "security anthropologists" have organized for more recognition and legitimation within the American Anthropological Association. The article considers what is new about the current controversy, and it examines the issues at stake for anthropologists and the people who they study. It argues that anthropologists need to raise anew basic questions about their disciplinary and intellectual endeavors and that they must re-educate themselves on the realities of power.

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Polycarp Ikuenobe

This article examines Nnamdi Azikiwe’s idea of mental emancipation as the intellectual foundation for his political philosophy. Mental emancipation involves re-educating Africans to adopt scientific, critical, analytic, and logical modes of thinking. Azikiwe argues that development must involve changing Africans’ intellectual attitudes and educational system. He argues that Western education, through perpetuating negative stereotypes and engendering ‘colonial mentality’, has neither fostered critical and scientific thinking, nor enabled Africans to apply their knowledge for development. Mental emancipation would enable Africans to develop self-confidence, and the critical examination of superstitious beliefs that have hindered Africa’s development. I show that Azikiwe’s ideas have been recaptured by African philosophers like Bodunrin and Wiredu, regarding their critique of aspects of African tradition and prescription for how African philosophy can contribute to development.

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Lionel Blue

holds in this life – as formerly but now more acutely – it is best to live in the present, which most of us don’t do enough. I have always lived too much on future hopes or in past fears. Keeping to the present requires a re-education and it is better to

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Remembering the “Forgotten Zone”

Recasting the Image of the Post-1945 French Occupation of Germany

Corey Campion

. Indeed, the negative image of the French occupation agenda endured in both the French- and German-language historiographies throughout the 1970s and early 1980s. Among several studies of French denazification and reeducation policies published during this

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Meglio di ieri

Educational Films, National Identity and Citizenship in Italy from 1948 to 1968

Anne Bruch

pass through the promotion, starting with the new generations, of completely new cultural and civil models.” 14 The repercussions of the epurazione (antifascist purge) as well as the process of re-education 15 resulted in the Scelba law of 1952

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Are “the Natives” Educable?

Dutch Schoolchildren Learn Ethical Colonial Policy (1890–1910)

Elisabeth Wesseling and Jacques Dane

children in the Indies, it passes over the ways in which the empire transformed the education of children in the Netherlands. Only scant research has been done on the actual practices of child relocation and reeducation in the East Indies, 14 as opposed to

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Introduction: World Knowledge and Non-European Space

Nineteenth Century Geography Textbooks and Children’s Books

Andreas Weiß

plantation economy system which required that Javanese farmers deliver a quota of natural products to the colonial state as a kind of tax, a system which in turn required more administrators and a re-education program for the colonial elite. Wesseling and

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Introduction

Educational Films: A Historical Review of Media Innovation in Schools

Eckhardt Fuchs, Anne Bruch, and Michael Annegarn-Gläß

Translator : Nicola Watson

This organization continues to produce educational films for the whole of Germany today. The use of educational films continued after 1945. They played a central role in re-education and democratization programs run by the Allies in the western