Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 813 items for :

  • "refugeeness" x
  • Refine by Access: All content x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

“A Refugee Pastor in a Refugee Church”

Refugee-Refugee Hosting in a Faith-Based Context

Karen Lauterbach

a thick, red curtain. During our conversation, Pastor Justin talked about himself as “a refugee pastor in a church of refugees,” referring to the difficulty of establishing and expanding a church when both pastors and members are refugees. Moreover

Open access

Lessons from Refugees

Research Ethics in the Context of Resettlement in South America

Marcia Vera Espinoza

From 2012 to 2015 I conducted research exploring the experiences of resettlement of a group of Colombian and Palestinian refugees in Chile and Brazil ( Vera Espinoza 2015 , 2017 , 2018a , 2018b ). The research methodology used a qualitatively

Open access

Expat, Local, and Refugee

“Studying Up” the Global Division of Labor and Mobility in the Humanitarian Industry in Jordan

Reem Farah

Introduction Since 2012, over a million Syrians have fled to Jordan, 671,551 of whom are registered refugees ( UNOCHA 2019 ). Due to economic instability and rising unemployment in the country, the incoming demographic was scapegoated for

Restricted access

‘Refugees Are Welcome Here!’

How Public Opinion Got Ahead of Government in Summer 2015 and Stayed There

Maurice Wren

For those working at the coalface of the refugee and asylum system – whether supporting families, adults or separated children as they seek protection, or pressing the government for more asylum system reform, or trying to inform and influence

Open access

Laborers, Migrants, Refugees

Managing Belonging, Bodies, and Mobility in (Post)Colonial Kenya and Tanzania

Hanno Brankamp and Patricia Daley

neighboring countries, in particular Kenya and Tanzania. By 2000, Tanzania was hosting around 702,000 refugees and asylum seekers, while Kenya was home to over 219,000 ( UNHCR 2004 ). Since then, Kenya's refugee population has soared to 490,000, while 337

Open access

Refugees and Fish Fingers

How Visegrad Policymakers Used Emancipatory Narratives to Establish a ‘Right to Reject’

Lucia Najslova

A policy workshop on refugees has just ended. This one was in a format in which academics and journalists presented their observations from recent months and diplomats and other academics sat in the audience. Participants now continued the

Open access

Refugee studies in Austria today

From challenges to a research horizon

Leonardo Schiocchet, Sabine Bauer-Amin, Maria Six-Hohenbalken, and Andre Gingrich

How can anthropology and anthropologists contribute to the current refugee/migration debate, particularly in Europe? How relevant is anthropology to this topic today? This article engages these questions through our experience in setting up and

Open access

The Christian Right and Refugee Rights

The Border Politics of Anti-communism and Anti-discrimination in South Korea

Angie Heo

destination known for its white sand beaches and volcanic landscape. Throughout that summer, thousands of protestors belted out slogans like “Kungmin Mŏnjŏda!” (Nation First!) and “Katcha Nanmin Out!” (Fake Refugees Out!) that reverberated between the island

Open access

Decolonial Approaches to Refugee Migration

Nof Nasser-Eddin and Nour Abu-Assab in Conversation

Nof Nasser-Eddin and Nour Abu-Assab

think this is a very important topic, because we agree with you, Elena. Most studies, not only in academic institutions, but also those undertaken by institutions like governments or civil societies, have focused on the “refugee crisis” between Southern

Restricted access

Governing through Uncertainty

Experiences of Being a Refugee in Turkey as a Country for Temporary Asylum

Kristen Sarah Biehl

This article addresses the question of how to theorize the relation between uncertainty and governmentality with regard to displacement and its consequences. It explores the experiences of asylum seekers in Turkey and the bureaucratic processes of refugee status determination, local dispersal, and third country resettlement, illustrating two main points throughout. First, 'protracted uncertainty', characterized by indefinite waiting, limited knowledge, and unpredictable legal status, is a central element of the experience of being an asylum seeker in Turkey. Second, this uncertainty serves to demobilize, contain, and criminalize asylum seekers through the production of protracted uncertainty, which in turn is normalized as a necessity of bureaucracy and/or security. The article invites readers to question the governmentalities of asylum and border regimes that not only discipline refugees' everyday movements but also determine the uncertainty of 'refugeeness'.