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Remobilizing Religion in Utopian Studies

A View from a Feminist Literary and Historical Scholar of Utopia

Barnita Bagchi

sisterhood between women, including those belonging to different religions and races, to resist the oppression of women. This oppression, Hossain argues, cuts across religions and races. My article examines how factors such as gender and cross

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What Do Religions Actually Fight About?

A Durkheimian Perspective

Bruno Karsenti

Manifestations of religious violence in supposedly secular modern societies require that we consider religion to be a motive of action with a specific power of its own, and also a mode to which other motives give way that seem better anchored and

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Religion sans espace sacré

Durkheim, l’Église catholique et les cités périphériques en Allemagne

Frank Eckardt

protection à l'individu sera-t-il encore possible dans une église ouverte à tous ? Et le sacré, ainsi que le soutenait Durkheim, est-il essentiel à la compréhension de l'organisation sociale d'une communauté religieuse ? Selon Durkheim, les religions se

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Money, Religion, and Symbolic Exchange in Winter Sleep

Bülent Diken

interested in tracing the surface between cinematic and social theoretical ideas, their ‘compossibility’. These ideas emerge from the themes that Winter Sleep deals with: religion, the relationship between religion and capitalism, symbolic exchange, and

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Religion and Diaspora

Paul Christopher Johnson

Diaspora, and with it 'diasporic religion', has exploded as an area of research in the field of Religion, opening important paths of inquiry and analysis. This article traces the itineraries and intersections of Diaspora and Religion over the last two decades, especially vis-à-vis groups that activate multiple diasporic horizons. It then evaluates the risks of the overdispersion of Diaspora. To counter this, the article recommends more narrowly circumscribing Diasporic Religion in relation to 'territory', while at the same time rendering the question of what territoriality means more complex and diverse.

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Attitudes towards Religion(s) in a 'Non-believing' Czech Republic

Zdeněk R. Nešpor

The Czech Republic is widely known as 'the least religious' country in the world. However, Czechs might be considered unchurched rather than nonreligious, with various forms of modern New Age spirituality steadily gaining in popularity. The question is, therefore, what is the position of religion - both 'traditional' and 'new' - within a 'non-believing' society? The article commences with a presentation of data taken from two recent sociological surveys on religion, but the author mainly exploits ethnographical research carried out in the medium-sized Czech town of Česká Lípa to address the issue. This research examined both 'old' and 'new' church religion, 'alternative' spiritual outlets, and the religious attitudes of the general population. The author concludes that the traditional religionists of various denominations, followers of the New Age movement(s), and the 'rest' of the population can be seen as three distinctive groups within society and that mutual understanding and acceptance are practically non-existent.

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The Concept of Religion in Meiji Popular Discourse

An Analysis of the Newspaper Yomiuri Shimbun

Makoto Harris Takao

religion.” Indeed, the absence of a universal religious category in the mid-nineteenth century manifests itself in his writing through the use of the broadly inclusive term kyō/oshie (教一“teaching/s”). In this poem, such “teachings” are at once a reference

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How Do Religions End?

Theorizing Religious Traditions from the Point of View of How They Disappear

Joel Robbins

What does it mean for a new religion to arise or take hold among a group of people? What does it mean for a religious tradition to endure? These are questions that are quite commonly addressed, at least implicitly, in the study of religion. Less frequently asked is the question of what it means for a religious tradition to come to an end. This article addresses this question, paying particular attention to the ways people actively dismantle a religious tradition that previously shaped their lives. I also consider what studying the process of religious disappearance can teach us about what it means for a tradition to arise and endure, arguing that a grasp on processes of religious dissolution is necessary for a fully rounded approach to the study of religious change. Throughout the article, I illustrate my arguments with material from the study of Christianity, Judaism and indigenous religious traditions, particularly from Oceania.

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Anthropology and the Cognitive Science of Religion

A Critical Assessment

Carles Salazar

Recent cognitive and evolutionary approaches to the study of religion have been seen by many as a naturalistic alternative to conventional anthropological interpretations. Whereas anthropologists have traditionally accounted for the existence of religion in terms of social and cultural determinants, cognitive scientists have emphasized the innate—that is pre-cultural—constraints placed by natural selection on the formation and acquisition of religious ideas. This article provides a critical assessment of the main theoretical proposals put forward by cognitive scientists and suggests possible interactions, perhaps interdependencies, with more standard anthropological sensibilities, especially between cognitive and evolutionary perspectives that see religion as a by-product of innate psychological dispositions and anthropological approaches that take the 'meaningful' nature of religious symbols as their point of departure.

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The Russian Career of Durkheim's Sociology of Religion and Les Formes Élémentaires

Contribution to a Study

Alexander Gofman

In tracking Durkheim's Russian career, this article first explores Russian sociology during his lifetime, emphasizing its internationalism and noting Russian-related reviews in the Année sociologique. It then focuses on the issue of religion, to compare his approach with contemporary Russian trends, especially bogoyiskatielstvo (god quest) and bogostroyitielstvo (god building). In concluding with the Russian reception of his last great work, Les Formes élémentaires, it contrasts the circumstances before and after his death, the year of the Bolshevik Revolution, and especially compares the responses of Nikolai Berdyaev and Pitirim Sorokin.