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Replication, Regeneration or Organic Birth

The Clone in Deryn Rees-Jones' Quiver and Donna Haraway's 'A Cyborg Manifesto'

Zoë Brigley

Rees-Jones' Quiver and Donna Haraway's 'A Cyborg Manifesto' explore how different mythologies of being can emancipate women from and create a dialogue with ordinary female reproduction. Haraway and Rees-Jones use advances in reproductive and mechanical technologies to imagine new modes of being which are not simply products of the imagination, but a recycling of images and debates of concern to women and feminists. In Test-Tube Women: What Future for Motherhood?, Rita Arditti, Renate Duelli Klein and Shelley Minden ask a pertinent question: '[e]ach time a new technological development is hailed the same question arises: is this liberation or oppression in a new guise?' Both Haraway and Rees-Jones explore the rise of new technologies in relation to gender and maternity and gauge the emancipatory or oppressive possibilities.

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Heritage

Renovation, Relocation, Remediation, and Repositioning Museums

Mary Bouquet

This article examines the changing relationship between museums and heritage using a number of Dutch cases. It argues that if heritage was once defined as being museological in character, this order of precedence is under revision as museums themselves are recursively transformed by heritage dynamics. Such dynamics include the display of renovation work-in-progress; the enhancement of historical collections by relocation to prominent new sites and buildings; the transformation of old industrial sites into new art and public spaces; and a mutual reinforcement between the urban landscape setting and the institutions that compose it by virtual means. Postcolonial heritage practices worldwide enfold museums in a further set of transformatory dynamics: these include claims on cultural property that was removed in colonial times, but also the strategic transformation of cultural property into heritage for didactic purposes. Museums are subject to the recursive dynamics of heritage, which are turning them inside out.

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Eternity and Print

How Medieval Ideas of Time Influenced the Development of Mechanical Reproduction of Texts and Images

Bennett Gilbert

initial deployment of replicative technologies ca. 1375–ca. 1450 onward. And yet this dynamo of change, print, and especially typography—a new industrial complex—is portrayed as having arisen rather abruptly and then rapidly spreading, with little

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Anna Tsing

from their life worlds. Plantations are machines of replication, ecologies devoted to the production of the same. As many anthropologists have shown, disentangling things in this way is really exotic. To make resources – that is, disentangled things

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Ivan Mozzhukhin’s Acting Style

Beyond the Kuleshov Effect

Johannes Riis

on Kuleshov’s work as a reeditor indicate that expressiveness may have been a critical part of Mozzhukhin’s role. Scientists’ attempts at replicating the Kuleshov effect, based on an assumption of inexpressive close-ups, direct our attention in a

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“And much more I am soryat for my good knyghts”

Fainting, Homosociality, and Elite Male Culture in Middle English Romance

Rachel E. Moss

propels the action forward; it also gives the sense of a great mass of men acting as one body, moving tirelessly onward through the ranks of the enemy. This homosocial space offers a physical and emotional unity rarely replicated elsewhere, because it

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Jeffrey Newman

In the early years of European Judaism, these colloquia (possibly following the pattern established by Commentary) were a distinctive feature. Re-reading the six of them is both moving and thought-provoking. But do these colloquia themselves still have anything to offer? Can we learn from what took place? Should we attempt to replicate the format? What follows is partial rather than systematic and the reflections follow personal interests rather than being judgments on quality.

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Sébastien Dubé

of David Mitrany's functionalist theory. The conditions are not met for another “traditional” wave of regionalism for at least three reasons. First, there is no supply from elites nor demand from civil society to replicate previous models or revive

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Nahua Repositories of Social Memory

The Seventeenth-Century Mexican Primordial Titles

Amos Megged

Through the analysis of two exemplary sources pertaining to the genre of the Nahua primordial titles of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the aim of this essay is to contribute further to our understanding of how this distinct Nahua colonial genre can be used for the study of Nahua social memory during Spanish colonial times. More precisely, what this present essay endeavors to identify the subtextual and supra-textual layers in these two sources. Second, it aims to highlight the replicated memory formulas applied in these specific texts; and third, to analyze the role of Christianity in these memory plots. By way of these three aspects, the task of this present study is to demonstrate that customs of remembrance, deeply rooted in the practice of a collective social memory were still cherished and kept vibrant during the mid colonial period.

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Dan Merkur

Drawing on phenomenology and his clinical practice, the author explores religious experience and the dynamics of the numinous. The article opens with the argument that psychoanalysts, like religious healers, should be able to work with religious phenomena as part of psychoanalytic therapy. The origin of the term 'numinous' is explained, and two types of human religious experience, mysterium tremendum and fascinans, are detailed. The role of anxiety in converting a metaphorical illusion (fascinans) into a private symbol (mysterium tremendum) is described. The terms by which religion can be viewed alternatively as delusion, illusion, and tenable speculation are discussed. A patient's religious concerns with the sacred and the profane are presented as symptoms of the repression of numinous experiences. Therapy can be promoted through a psychoanalytic dialogue on the patient's religiosity and its partial replication of early object relations.