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Richard J. Ladle and Paul Jepson

The concept of extinction is at the heart of the modern conservation movement, and massive resources have been spent on developing models and frameworks for quantifying and codifying a phenomenon that has been described by American researcher and naturalist Edward O. Wilson as an obscure and local biological process. Scientists, environmentalists, and politicians have repeatedly used extinction rhetoric as a core justification for a global conservation agenda that seeks to influence a wide range of human activities despite the inherent difficulty and uncertainty involved in estimating current and future rates of extinction, or even in verifying the demise of a particular species. In this article we trace the historical origins of the extinction concept and discuss its power to influence policies, agendas, and behaviors. We argue that conservation needs to develop a more culturally meaningful rhetoric of extinction that aligns scientific evidence, cultural frames, institutional frameworks, and organizational interests.

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From Rhetoric to Identification

Miscommunication in Inter-ethnic Contact

Rano Turaeva

The article analyses speech varieties among Uzbek migrants in Tashkent city in Uzbekistan to shed light on inter-ethnic contact. I do this through discussing various rhetorical strategies and linguistic means employed during the identification processes. 'We-codes' and 'They-codes' as well as the analysis of intent and 'perceived intent' are the centre of the theoretical argument of the article. It is important to consider communication and miscommunication when studying inter-ethnic relations and collective identities. I argue that it is necessary to distinguish between intent and what I call 'perceived intent' when analysing miscommunication. The data used for the article is drawn from the ethnography of communication among Khorezmians and other Uzbek groups in the capital city of Tashkent in Uzbekistan. Theoretically, the article contributes to the recent scholarly debate on language and identity pioneered by Gumperz, Hymes, Giles and Fishman among others.

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Televised Election Debates in a Deliberative System

The Role of Framing and Emotions

Emma Turkenburg

the quality of political debates ( Coleman 2013 , 2020 ; Davidson et al. 2017 ; Lord and Tamvaki 2013 ; Marien et al. 2020 ; Wyss et al. 2015 ). TEDs have flaws and can be problematic, notably through the manipulative use of rhetoric. Nonetheless

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Ehren Helmut Pflugfelder

additionally useful to frame the discursive-material experience and performance of gender through a slightly different framework—that of material rhetorics. A move to consider a material and rhetorical exploration of gendered experience in autonomous vehicles

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A Body of Texts

Memento and Mētis

Jeremy Tirrell

engage this subject from the position of materialist rhetoric by interpreting Leonard through the classical concept of mētis —the cunning ability to respond to the contingent, kairotic moment by engaging situations through a reciprocal process of

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Political Comedy as Fuel for Populist Rhetoric?

Representations of Politicians and Institutions in the German TV Shows “Eichwald MdB” and “Ellerbeck”

Niko Switek

it uses to disqualify the established political parties and demand more direct democracy in place of representative democracy. This raises some interesting questions: How similar are satirical presentations of politicians to the populist rhetoric of

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From Rhetoric to Practice

A critique of immigration policy in Germany through the lens of Turkish-Muslim women's experiences of migration

Sherran Clarence

The largest group of migrants in Germany is the Turkish people, many of whom have low skills levels, are Muslim, and are slow to integrate themselves into their host communities. German immigration policy has been significantly revised since the early 1990s, and a new Immigration Act came into force in 2005, containing more inclusive stances on citizenship and integration of migrants. There is a strong rhetoric of acceptance and open doors, within certain parameters, but the gap between the rhetoric and practice is still wide enough to allow many migrants, particularly women, to fall through it. Turkish-Muslim women bear the brunt of the difficulties faced once they have arrived in Germany, and many of them are subject to domestic abuse, joblessness and poverty because of their invisibility to the German state, which is the case largely because German immigration policy does not fully realise a role and place for women migrants. The policy also does not sufficiently account for ethnic and cultural identification, or limitations faced by migrants in that while it speaks to integration, it does not fully enable this process to take place effectively. Even though it has made many advances in recent years towards a more open and inclusive immigration policy, Germany is still a 'reluctant' country of immigration, and this reluctance stops it from making any real strides towards integrating migrants fully into German society at large. The German government needs to take a much firmer stance on the roles of migrant women in its society, and the nature of the ethnic and religious identities of Muslim immigrants, in order to both create and implement immigration policy that truly allows immigrants to become full and contributing members to German social and economic life, and to bring it in line with the European Union's common directives on immigration.

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Osnat Akirav

needed to adjust to the new challenge, and to adopt new strategies and rhetoric regarding potential political partners. In this article, we explore political parties’ innovations and how they rose to that challenge by seeking partnerships even with those

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“Biggest Nationalist in the Country”

Self-Descriptive Uses of “Nationalist” in Contemporary Russia

Veera Laine

particularistic and universalistic claims makes isms useful in political rhetoric. 9 The rhetorical appeal of nationalism stems from the same source, even though it is a rather peculiar example within the category of isms. Scholarly debates on whether

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Paul Walker

This article explores interactions with difference, highlighting what I call the “generosity paradox,” a term that refers to how we suspend disbelief and certainty in favor of a constructed potentiality not limited by preexistent knowledge or categories of authenticity and legitimacy. Touching on overlapping concepts from rhetoric, philosophy, gender studies, disability studies, and queer theory, the discussion explicates fictional encounters with radical alterity in the film Her (Spike Jonze, 2013) to show that attempted respite from frustrating, confusing, and frightening interactions limits our voice, undermines difference, and favors a unifying persuasive intent, which more likely than not involves an attempt to change Others rather than allowing our mutual differences to generatively remain.