Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

Methods for Multispecies Anthropology

Thinking with Salmon Otoliths and Scales

Heather Anne Swanson

This article proposes that multispecies anthropology and its curiosities about non-humans constitute a ‘minor anthropology’ that poses challenges not only to anthropological categories, but also to anthropological methods. Through attention to Pacific salmon, I probe why and how anthropologists might explore the ways non-humans know and enact worlds via collaborations with natural scientists. Working with biologists, I examine salmon scales and otoliths, or ear bones, whose crystallization patterns act as a kind of fish diary, recording a fish’s migrations and relations. I take up these methods with an anthropological eye, asking how one might use such practices to learn about multispecies encounters that classical ethnography often misses. Lastly, I demonstrate how anthropologists can engage natural science tools while remaining alert to the politics of knowing.

Restricted access

Françoise Bartiaux and Luis Reátegui Salmón

Based on empirical data on “green” practices according to household size, this article questions the role, if any, given to close personal relationships by social practice theories in sustaining or not daily life practices. Data are mainly drawn from an Internet survey conducted in Belgium in 2006 by WWF-Belgium on daily practices, related to food, energy consumption, mobility, and tourism. Results show that smaller households carry out more numerous “green” practices than larger ones. The concluding discussion underlines the relevance of including social interactions—namely within the household—into the conceptual framework derived from the social theories of practices, to take into account the rearticulating role of social interactions and domestic power claims when carrying out a practice or a set of practices, and when changing it.

Restricted access

‘Isteach chun an Oileáin’

Reflections on Community Mapping

Liam Campbell and Iain Mackinnon

Since 2007 the Irish government have prevented the fisher-men of the Donegal islands of Arranmore, Tory and Inishbofin from engaging in their generations-old drift-net salmon fishery. We have been involved in supporting the islanders as they organise themselves to find ways to oppose the ban. In this dialogue we reflect on some aspects of our involvement.

Restricted access

Andrzej Rozwadowski, Brian Donahoe, Olga M. Cooke, Dmitri Funk, Iraida Nam, Christopher Hill, Tero Mustonen, Brad Paige and David G. Anderson

Peter Jordan, Landscape and Culture in Northern Eurasia Andrzej Rozwadowski

Andrew Wiget and Olga Balalaeva, Khanty: People of the Taiga: Surviving the 20th Century Brian Donahoe

Andrew A. Gentes, trans., Russia's Penal Colony in the Far East: A Translation of Vlas Doroshevich's “Sakhalin” Olga M. Cooke

Erich Kasten, Cultures and landscapes of the North-East Asia: 250 years of Russian-German research in ecology and culture of indigenous peoples of Kamchatka Dmitri Funk and Iraida Nam

Mertin I. Eren, Hunter-Gatherer Behavior: Human Response during the Younger Dryas Christopher Hill

Anna A. Sirina, Katanga Evenkis in the 20th Century and the Ordering of Their Life-World; Olga Ulturgasheva, Narrating the Future in Siberia: Childhood, Adolescence and Autobiography among the Eveny Tero Mustonen

Charles Hartley, G. Bike Yazicioglu, and Adam T. Smith, The Archaeology of Power and Politics in Eurasia: Regimes and Revolutions Brad Paige

Benedict J. Colombi and James F. Brooks, Keystone Nations: Indigenous Peoples and Salmon across the North Pacific David G. Anderson

Books Available for Review