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Banu Nilgün Uygun

This essay explores the sexual-economic transactions between Turkish men and women from the former Soviet Union (FSU), focusing on Trabzon, a Turkish port town on the southeast coast of the Black Sea. I first provide background on 'the new migration' from the FSU to Turkey, paying particular attention to some of the political stakes in discussions of transnational sex work. I then explore these issues through the stories of two migrant women from the FSU who live in Trabzon. In these stories I highlight the ambiguity and complexity of sexual-economic transactions between local men and migrant women to show the inadequacy of the category 'sex work'. Finally, I turn to the demand side of the equation and consider the ideologies shaping the perceptions of local men. I situate them within the context of discourses of modernity in Turkey as they are reconfigured by Turkey's integration into global markets.

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Response

The Mobile Itineraries of Knowledge-scapes

Mimi Sheller

This special section elucidates intersections between the historiography of mobilities and the interdisciplinary field of mobilities research. The articles highlight relationships between mobilities and stabilization, circulation and place-making, deterritorialization and reterritorialization. This response essay seeks to dispel three myths about mobility studies: (1) that it is purely about the contemporary world, rather than the historical dimensions of mobile processes; (2) that it focuses solely on material phenomenon of physical transport (i.e., of things and people) and ignores the movement of ideas, knowledge, and culture; and (3) that it is purely about “flows” and “circulation” and has little to teach us about friction, resistances, blockages, or uneven power relations. The most important intersections of the histories of mobilities and the field of mobility studies can be found in the ways in which each emphasizes power differentials, blockages, friction, and the relation between mobilities and immobilities.

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Introduction

Elsewhere Affects and the Politics of Engagement across Religious Life-Worlds

Omar Kasmani, Nasima Selim, Hansjörg Dilger, and Dominik Mattes

Elsewhere Opens Imagine a divided mountain-scape. A line of ceasefire. Fog. Imagine coming to a clearing. In a mist-covered, militarized order of here and t/here, affection makes way where vision or bodies cannot. Mothers call out to daughters

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Selfies and Self-Fictions

Calibrating Co-presence in and of ‘the Field’

Liana Chua

.” Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 21 ( 3 ): 641 – 659 . 10.1111/1467-9655.12254 Chua , Liana . 2018 . “ Too Cute to Cuddle? ‘Witnessing Publics’ and Interspecies Relations on the Social Media-scape of Orangutan Conservation

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Hayder Al-Mohammad and David Lempert

There Is No Such Thing as a Social Science: In Defence of Peter Winch. Directions in Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis. Phil Hutchinson, Rupert Read and Wes Sharrock, Surrey: Ashgate, 2008, ISBN 978-0-7546-4776-8, 148pp., Hb. £50.

Biocultural Diversity Conservation: A Global Sourcebook. Luisa Maffi and Ellen Woodley, Washington, DC: Earthscan Publishers, 2010, ISBN 9781844079216, 282pp., Hb. £34.99.

The Heritage-scape: UNESCO, World Heritage, and Tourism. Michael A. Di Giovine, New York: Lexington Books, 2009, ISBN: 9780739114346, 519 pp., Hb. $95, Pb. $45.

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Kirsten Harjes

In 1997, Hinrich Seeba offered a graduate seminar on Berlin at the University of California, Berkeley. He called it: "Cityscape: Berlin as Cultural Artifact in Literature, Art, Architecture, Academia." It was a true German studies course in its interdisciplinary and cultural anthropological approach to the topic: Berlin, to be analyzed as a "scape," a "view or picture of a scene," subject to the predilections of visual perception in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This course inspired my research on contemporary German history as represented in Berlin's Holocaust memorials. The number and diversity of these memorials has made this city into a laboratory of collective memory. Since the unification of East and West Germany in 1990, memorials in Berlin have become means to shape a new national identity via the history shared by both Germanys. In this article, I explore two particular memorials to show the tension between creating a collective, national identity, and representing the cultural and historical diversity of today's Germany. I compare the Denkmal für die ermordeten Juden Europas (Memorial for the Murdered Jews of Europe, or "national Holocaust memorial") which opened in central Berlin on May 10, 2005, to the lesser known, privately sponsored, decentralized "stumbling stone" project by artist Gunter Demnig.

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Introduction

Visibility and Screen Politics after the Transgender Tipping Point

Wibke Straube

Progress , the trans character no longer requires an “exit scape,” as the other characters are allies rather than enemies and, without questioning or undermining the trans identity of their fellow character, follow the brief on pronouns and name changes

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Underwater

Where Environmental Aesthetics Meets Magical Realism

Rodanthi Tzanelli

these worlds as parts of Greek (land)scapes; and the style in which they “taught” visitors to apprehend all the above in visceral styles. The result of placing images of sea life and marine ruins among living creatures was, in the words of Underwater

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Julia Ros-Cuéllar, Harlan Koff, Carmen Maganda, and Edith Kauffer

Victor Konrad, analyzes the changes in transboundary dynamics of the China–Southeast Asia border: the formerly restricted interaction between these regions has shifted into a controlled but semi-permeable “security-scape” with corridors and points of

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Yoram Peri and Paul L. Scham

’s ‘desolate’ land scapes has changed considerably over time to fit the needs of Zionism’s policy-and opinion-makers, from the ‘land without a people’ trope of early Zionism, through a wilderness to be conquered, to today’s emphasis on finding peace and