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Carl Plantinga

I would like to thank Jane Stadler, Malcolm Turvey, and Cynthia Freeland for their careful readings of and responses to my book, Screen Stories: Emotion and the Ethics of Engagement . The three responses are revisions and extensions of their

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Malcolm Turvey

In his important new book, Carl Plantinga argues that screen stories “often make a case, explicitly or implicitly, for the adoption [by the audience] of certain ethical and socio-moral perspectives”; that screen stories reward viewers for adopting

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Carl Plantinga

Screen Stories: Emotion and the Ethics of Engagement (hereafter Screen Stories ) provides a framework for an ethics of long-form storytelling on screens. The book conceives of ethics as the “ecology of storytelling.” We likely all agree that the

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Ethical Engagement with Movies

Response to Carl Plantinga's Screen Stories

Cynthia Freeland

The boldest feature of Carl Plantinga's new book Screen Stories is that he concedes a point heretofore defended mainly by rival types of cinema theorists: the manipulative power of screen stories. Thus, Plantinga comments right at the start of

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Jane Stadler

Carl Plantinga's Screen Stories: Emotion and the Ethics of Engagement (2018) comes alive with vivid examples that illuminate how emotional engagement with film and television informs ethical life as characterization, narration, and style

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Carl Plantinga

sad for some unknown reason. But a sad mood in a screen story is different. When a person has a mood, it is a mental state. When a screen story has a mood, it must be something else, quite obviously. Whatever that something else is, it is likely to

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The Origins of the Girl Hero

Shirley Temple, Child Star and Commodity

Rebecca C. Hains

Since the late 1990s, "girl power" programs featuring girl heroes have emerged as an important new trend in children's television. However, girl heroes are not as new as they seem. Producers of mass media texts created many girl heroes in the 1930s, before the adoption of television as a mainstream medium, but the scholarly literature on today's girl heroes rarely acknowledges these pre-television predecessors. To address this gap, this paper presents research on the depictions of the strong orphan girls portrayed by Shirley Temple, positioned as cultural girl heroes in the 1930s. It explores the commercial contexts in which films starring Shirley Temple were produced and offers an analytical discussion of the positive and problematic features of these stories and the product lines associated with them. By understanding the themes, commercial contexts, and controversial aspects of Shirley Temple's on-screen stories as marketplace commodities, scholars can better study the relevance and importance of the girl heroes who are so popular in today's marketplace.

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Ted Nannicelli

-Bajo, Juri-Petri Valtanen, and Pertti Saariluoma, who outline a new mixed (qualitative and quantitative) method approach to the study of how feature films elicit viewer interest. Our book symposium on Carl Plantinga's Screen Stories: Emotion and the Ethics

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“Mind the Gap”

Between Movies and Mind, Affective Neuroscience, and the Philosophy of Film

Jane Stadler

Aesthetics of Film joins Carl Plantinga’s Screen Stories: Emotion and the Ethics of Engagement (2018) and Mark Johnson’s The Aesthetics of Meaning and Thought: The Bodily Roots of Philosophy, Science, Morality, and Art (2018) in the latest wave of

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Shaping Edits, Creating Fractals

A Cinematic Case Study

James E. Cutting and Karen Pearlman

the present and those of the recent past). This cooperation and competition of the present and future with patterns of the past is understood somewhat more colloquially by filmmakers. It is the process of shaping a screen story where alternating