Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 141 items for :

  • "secondary school" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Esilda Luku

Marxist-Leninist philosophy, 11 was entirely silent about the Holocaust. Lower and upper secondary school textbooks such as The History of Albania and the History of the Contemporary World , which were published in several editions between 1973 and

Restricted access

Marc Kropman, Carla van Boxtel, and Jannet van Drie

. Research shows that, in several countries, textbook narratives about a nation's past tend to represent a limited, nationalistic perspective. 3 In the Netherlands, secondary school pupils are expected to develop their historical thinking and reasoning

Restricted access

Luigi Cajani

This article reconstructs the evolution of the representation of Italian colonialism in history textbooks for upper secondary schools from the Fascist era to the present day. Textbook analysis is conducted here in parallel with the development of Italian historiography, with special attention being paid to the myth of the "good Italian", incapable of war crimes and violence against civilians, that has been cherished by Italian public opinion for a long time. Italian historians have thoroughly reconstructed the crimes perpetrated by the Italian army both in the colonies and in Yugoslavia and Greece during the Second World War, and this issue has slowly entered history textbooks.

Restricted access

Hirut Tefferi and Katy Anis

This report aims to identify the individual and external factors that have engendered the development of resilience among Ethiopian secondary school girls. Pact Ethiopia initiated this study on resilience as a component of the GET-SET project in order to better understand how girls overcome and pursue their education despite multifarious adversities in their personal lives and in the wider environment. The GET SET project is funded by the Oak Foundation, a donor which funds activities to combat global social and environmental concern that have a major impact on the lives of the disadvantaged, particularly in relation to child abuse, human rights and women’s development. The GET SET project works to empower girls whose life circumstances put them at risk of sexual exploitation and abuse in their communities and school environment. GET SET builds on a sister project of Pact Ethiopia, Girls’ Empowerment and Management Project (GEM), which provided significant academic strengthening, economic strengthening and life skills training inputs into girls’ lives over a two-year period. GET SET operates around the vicinity of fifteen secondary schools in three regions of Ethiopia: Amhara, Gambella and Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples Region (SNNPR).

Restricted access

Gabriel Pirický

Local populations in Hungary, Poland, and Slovakia, and to a lesser degree in the Czech Republic, experienced much interaction with Muslims throughout the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, when the Ottomans, as well as the Crimean Tatars, invaded the Kingdom of Hungary and waged wars against the Polish-Lithuanian state and the Habsburg Hereditary Lands. The Ottoman era has usually been reflected in the history textbooks of these four countries under the headings "Turkish Wars" or "Ottoman Expansion." Since the collapse of the Iron Curtain in 1989, all four ex-communist states have been involved in rewriting textbooks, although the perception of the Ottomans and Muslims has not changed in all cases. Without claiming to map the entire historical presentation of the Ottomans, this article demonstrates the polyphony found in the textbooks of this region. By analyzing secondary school educational materials in all four languages, it is possible to identify stereotypes, prejudices, and distortions within the perception of the Ottoman Turks.

Free access

“I Hope Nobody Feels Harassed”

Teacher Complicity in Gender Inequality in a Middle School

Susan McCullough

Americans .” Online Readings in Psychology and Culture 3 , no. 1 : 3 – 18 . 10.9707/2307-0919.1023 Lahelma , Elina . 2002 . “ Gendered Conflicts in Secondary School: Fun or Enactment of Power? ” Gender and Society 14 , no. 3 : 295 – 306

Restricted access

Working with the Cold War

Types of Knowledge in Swedish and Australian History Textbook Activities

Niklas Ammert and Heather Sharp

use of sources, and in explanation and communication. 4 In the Australian (history) curriculum the Cold War is presented for year ten pupils (fourth year of secondary school, when pupils are typically fifteen to sixteen years old) and is included

Restricted access

Martha Kamwendo

This article examines a group of Malawian teachers' views of the relationship between gender and achievement in order to highlight their participation in students' constructions of gendered identities, which in turn have an impact on achievement. Based on a survey with 35 teachers and interviews with 20 of them, the study on which this article is based shows how teachers position boys as high achievers and girls as low achievers. The teachers drew on a number of identity-related concepts that included sexuality, notions of femininity, differential gender socialization in the home, and self image to explain girls' underachievement. I discuss the implications of the findings and suggest how teachers can be encouraged to have a more positive attitude towards girls and their achievement.

Restricted access

A Literacy Landscape Unresolved

Beyond the Boy Crisis and into Superhero Fiction

Michael Kehler and Jacob Cassidy

author and conducted by the second author at a secondary school in rural, southwestern Ontario, Canada. Considering the relatively small, but growing, body of research on comics in education, and the even smaller pocket of research on the use of superhero

Restricted access

Experiencing, Using, and Teaching History

Two History Teachers’ Relations to History and Educational Media

Robert Thorp

observations of teaching practices, enabling an approach that will enhance analyses of how teachers discuss their teaching and implement it. Recent research on the representation of the Cold War in Swedish secondary school history textbooks has revealed that